'Never attempt election of this magnitude in 42 days': IEC on lesson learnt

The sixth democratic local government elections take place in a climate completely different to the previous five. COVID-19, shocking acts of corruption, party infighting and grossly inadequate service delivery across the country all have a role to play.

This includes the Beyers Naude, Kouga, Kou-Kamma municipalities in the Eastern Cape, as well as a number of municipalities in the Free State, Limpopo, and in Oudtshoorn in the Western Cape, which came as a surprise.

The FF Plus's Wouter Wessels said: “The FF Plus has doubled its support and we now have representation where we didn't have before.”

It's been another good election for the FF Plus, which has built on its 2019 success, an election in which it doubled its 2014 votes to 2.38%.

The Freedom Front Plus is one of the big winners of this election by early Wednesday afternoon, almost tripling their seats to 135 compared to 2016.

Most of these were at the expense of the DA, which has made gains in other areas.

However, EFF deputy president Floyd Shivambu has already suggested how two of the country's dominant parties should share power across the metros.

The party went into coalition with the DA to only dump them, later increasing the instability in those metros.

In the 2016 local government elections, the party emerged as kingmakers in Tshwane, the City of Joburg and in Nelson Mandela Bay.

The EFF is still the third largest party in the country, recording a marginal increase to 10%.

The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) on Wednesday said parties must set aside their egos as the number of hung municipalities increases across the country.

LONG READ - Research shows that low turnout is bad for democracy. It usually means that socioeconomically underprivileged citizens vote less and, as a result, public policies benefit the rich. Politicians feel less under public scrutiny and turn a deaf ear to the needs of the wider public. Instead of formulating general public policies serving society at large, governments can more easily target benefits to their core supporters.

ICYMI: Speaking on 3 November 2021, the ANC’s deputy secretary-general Jessie Duarte said the low voter turnout and the party's poor results are a message to the party. Duarte said ANC has heard the message loud and clear and is working on renewing itself.

At the same time, provincial leader Leon Basson said it was time voters took charge of their own fate.

“If you want some change, then you need to have to make the change and if you’re not willing to make the change, then I am not sure whether the North West will last another five years.”

But Economic Freedom Fighters provincial secretary Papiki Babuile said he knew why there was such deep apathy.

“People are tired, people have been voting for years with no service delivery.”

“Too tired, too hopeless, and too broke,” Mahikeng residents said they were not following the election outcome despite their desperate plea for a new government that would bring about changes in the troubled Mahikeng Local Municipality.

“I am not interested in them because I don’t think they concern me anyhow,” one resident said. While another said: “I get home tired, I don’t have time to watch the news.”

However, now that they’ve made their mark, residents seem not to be interested in who will lead their municipality.

Two weeks ago, residents woke up to dry taps for three consecutive days, prompting a visit from the Deputy Minister of Water and Sanitation David Mahlobo.

“Too busy to be bothered,” is the phrase used by some Mahikeng residents who on Wednesday said they had not been following the local government elections results, despite having complained about the dire state of service delivery and the rapid dilapidation of infrastructure in the provincial capital.

There have been 80 objections so far.

Mamabolo says he can't give a timeframe for 100% results conclusion.

Mamabolo says they don't want to push auditors for result

Mamabolo says they will work on making the voter management devices in future.

"Never attempt to do an election of this magnitude in 42 days," Mambolo says this is the lesson learnt from the elections. "It is dangerous."

Mamabolo says they ill not sleep until results for all municipalities are declared 

177 municipalities completed out of 257.

99.9% completion rate in NC
93.2% in EC
95.2% in NW
88.8% in WC
91.6% IN mp
90.7% in GP
98.6% in FS
83.9% and 88% in other provinces.

64,062 results have been captured. 62,539 have been audited. 58,956 have been scanned.

99.3% of the results have been captured, says CEO Sy Mamabolo.

WATCH LIVE: IEC briefing

The IEC will hold another update briefing at 8pm.

"ActionSA is committed to removing failing local governments across our country and replacing them with efficient, customer-oriented, and caring governments that deliver quality basic services to all communities, especially those who need them the most."

"As stated in our press briefing, held this morning at the IEC National Results Operations Centre (ROC) in Tshwane, it appears that what has characterized these elections for ActionSA is our unique appeal to all South Africans – across the racial and socio-economic spectrum. We are a party for all communities in the kaleidoscope of our country. If any political party hopes to capture the hearts and minds of South Africans towards the 2024 National Government Elections, it will be a party that unites South Africans, not one that divides them."

"ActionSA’s message, to the effect that we can FIX South Africa by fixing our municipalities, clearly resonated with them and they took the ACTION to vote for professional, corruption-free governance that provides services to all residents, and in an efficient manner."

"More than our team’s efforts, however, it is the people of Kwa-Dukuza who deserve the highest accolades for taking their power back and voting out bad, inefficient, and corrupt governance."

"We are proud of all our ground structures and the leaders who directed their collective efforts. For Kwa-Dukuza, particularly, we are proud of ActionSA’s Mayoral Candidate, Nel Sewraj, and his team, for a job well done."

"We are humbled that, as a party that is just over a year-old, we have made an undeniably groundbreaking mark in the six municipalities we contested - Johannesburg, Tshwane, Ekurhuleni, eThekwini, Kwa-Dukuza, and Newcastle."

"From the outset of our campaign, we set out to bring the African National Congress (ANC) under 50% wherever we contested, and we are proud to have achieved that goal in Kwa-Dukuza."

Action SA has released its latest update: 

"In a historic turn of events, ActionSA is elated to learn and inform South Africans that we have achieved an 8.47% win translating to 5 seats in the Kwa-Dukuza Municipal Council in Kwa-Zulu Natal."

Patriotic Allaince has also registered a few victories:

Here's the latest on the NW:

The IFP has secured control of three in its stronghold of KZN. 

The EFF is again going to be playing kingmaker in the hunt councils. 

With over 96% of votes captured, the ANC controls 84 councils while the DA is in charge of 11 municipalities. 

At this hour there are at least 49 hung councils across the country and it’s expected that this number will increase as final results are being audited. 

It seems hung councils will be the order of the day across some of the 257 municipalities in the country.

Against the backdrop of the ANC and the DA’s dismal performance and the rise of smaller parties, many more South Africans will live in municipalities governed by coalitions. 

ICYMI: IEC's latest briefing 

ICYMI: IEC WCprovincial electoral officer Michael Hendrickse was about to take questions from reporters when the president of the Democratic Independent Party (DIP), Anwar Adams, shouted that the elections had been irregular and should be re-run.

Mashatile: From where we stand. We will be able to work with the parties that agree with us. "We will knock on closed doors" with those who want to work with us.

Asked on whether the party will go into coalition in municipalities like NMB. Duarte: "Nothing is off the table." Duarte ays the party may consider a transactional coalition. She emphasises that they are not going into coalition because they are at a point of weakness.

"Our wish is to build better communities."

She says going forward, the ANC must ensure that more registered voters turnout in future elections, especially young people.

Duarte says the hung councils will create a need for coalitions, which isn't a new thing for the party. She says, however, that recent coalitions have been untidy, messy and greedy.

The results are a message to the ANC to shape up.

The challenges experienced voting were unfortunate and affected the ANC.

The ANC reaffirms its confidence in the IEC.

She says voters are, however, happy with the party's renewal and they are determined to do better.

She adds it was "among the most difficult election" the ANC has contested. She laments the disappointing voter turnout due to weather, date, COVID-19, load shedding, logistics. "However, it is an unambiguous signal to the ANC from the electorate. The low voter turnout, especially in traditional ANC strongholds, communicates a clear message. The people are disappointed in the ANC, with the slow progress in fixing local government. In ensuring quality basic services. In tackling corruption and greed.

Duarte says holding the election amid the COVID-19 presented a challenge for SA, but that it was free and fair.

The ANC's DSG Jessie Duarte and TG Paul Mashatile have just concluded a media briefing from the IEC centre.

There are 42 hung councils so far.

139 out of 257 have results complete and captured.

The IEC has South Africans to be patient with it as it completes the process.

In KZN, load shedding has apparently been a delaying factor.

The outstanding votes to be captured are in KZN, GP and LP.

Meanwhile, the IEC has just announced that 96.9% of the votes have been captured.

Together, we will secure Cape Town’s future, and show the rest of South Africa what is possible when voters take the courageous step of replacing ANC failure with DA progress. 

Millions of South Africans have taken the bold first step into a new future free from the ANC. The DA’s task now is to turn Cape Town into a shining example of what is possible when voters who are done with the ANC take the next step by choosing a better alternative. We must be that alternative.

The main national story of this election is quickly shaping up to be a dramatic falling away of support for the ANC, which has for the first time fallen well below 50% voter support in the country. This is a profound turning point moment and is very good news for South Africa.

But the DA’s work to protect Cape Town from the collapse of the national government does not only matter for the people of Cape Town. The success of our project to secure Cape Town’s future also matters profoundly for the rest of the country.

This was our clear offer to voters in this election, and it is our commitment going forward. Nothing exemplifies this commitment more than our determination to end load shedding in Cape Town over time. As if to confirm the urgency of this task, rolling power blackouts returned on the very same day that it became clear that the DA had won a renewed majority in Cape Town.

Cape Town must be the city that inspires hope for South Africa’s future. This means we must move boldly to protect Cape Town from the failures of service collapse at a national level – in electricity, in policing, and in public transport.

Our purpose in government is simple: to improve the living conditions of the poorest residents, to roll back poverty, to spread opportunity, to grow the economy, to deliver excellent basic services, to inspire optimism, and to be an example to the country.

I sincerely thank the people of Cape Town for putting their trust in me and the Democratic Alliance for the next five years. We are humbled by this show of faith, and we will work tirelessly to make every Capetonian proud to live in this city under a DA government that cares for them and works for them.

Projections indicate that we will win around 58,5% of the vote, nearly 40 percentage points ahead of the second largest party.

Hill-Lewis has released a statement which reads as follows:

With the results now nearly finalised, the Democratic Alliance is proud to announce that the people of Cape Town have elected a new DA government with a strong, outright majority.

For the DA, this means Geordin Hill-Lewis will be its new mayor.

The DA is raising the victory flag in Cape Town.

It seems the slow pace of vote verification and announcement is becoming an issue.

Gauteng Premier David Makhura said that the low voter turnout was sending a strong message to the African National Congress (ANC) that people had lost confidence in the governing party.

Makhura was speaking in Boksburg at Nehawu’s 12th national congress.

Voter turnout in the country's municipality has slumped dramatically compared to the last election, with the ANC losing major ground in some areas.

Of the 26 million voters registered to vote, more than 12 million cast their ballots.

Gauteng has seen a dramatic drop in voter numbers.

Businessman and Abantu Integrity Movement leader Khusta Jack said that he was willing to sign a "pact with the devil'' to get Gqeberha back on track.

He said that to see stability, it would be ideal to have one to three major parties running the Nelson Mandela Bay metro instead of an array of smaller parties with different interests.

With 60% of the votes counted in the metro, there was still no clear winner, with the Democratic Alliance (DA) sitting on 41% and the African National Congress (ANC) on 38% at last count.

Jack, who has been touted as a possible compromise mayoral candidate, said that he was willing to work with either the ANC or the DA if needed.

So far, independent candidates countrywide have garnered 450,000 of the votes, putting it in fifth position nationally. 

One SA Movement leader Mmusi Maimane said that he would now turn his attention to pushing for electoral reforms.

Maimane said that he would be writing to National Assembly Speaker Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula, giving her seven days to deal with the law to allow for independent candidates to run in national and provincial elections.


"We believe fundamentally that this election has shown that communities are wanting to take direct control and participation in their councils, which is a clear precursor to the fact that countrywide, we need to reform our Electoral Act to allow for a constituency-based model and to ensure that we can directly elect members of Parliament going towards 2024."

 The DA in KwaZulu-Natal is now fully in charge of the community in Phoenix, Northern Durban. 
 
 The party has taken over the last ward from ANC. 
 
 The DA had a controversial election campaign in the township after the party’s poster which read “The ANC calls racist, the DA calls heroes” was largely criticised. 
 
 And now as vote counting and capturing continues the party says it has won the hearts of Phoenix residents.

 Gqeberha businessman and Abantu Integrity Movement leader Khusta Jack, says he’s willing to sign a “pact with the devil” to get the city back on track.
 
 He says to see stability it would be ideal to have one to three major parties running the metro - instead of an array of smaller parties - with different interests.
 
 With 60% of the votes counted in the metro there’s still no clear winner with the DA sitting on 41% and the ANC on 38% - at this stage.

The IEC in the Western Cape is on Wednesday expected to give an update on the elections picture in the province.

Seventy-two percent of the province's vote has been captured, with the end in sight.

In the City of Cape Town, the Democratic Alliance (DA) is leading the pack with 62% of the vote, followed by the African National Congress (ANC) with 13%. 

In third place is the Good Party with 4% and the Cape Coloured Congress at 3%.

The Good Party's Brett Herron said that they were encouraged by their performance. 

 In the City of Cape Town, the Democratic Alliance (DA) is leading the pack with 62% of the vote, followed by the African National Congress (ANC) with 13%. In third place is the Good Party with 4% and the Cape Coloured Congress at 3%. 

ActionSA leader Herman Mashaba said that his party would only enter into a coalition to form a government if the idea was to serve South Africans. 

Mashaba has been updating the nation on the outcome of the party's senate meeting on Tuesday night which is its highest decision-making body.

He said that ActionSA would not form a government if it was not to serve society. 

"We will do it where our mandate is going to be to serve society not to serve political agendas and political parties. We will only enter into a coalition if the idea is to serve society and to serve everyone."

The IEC in the Western Cape is on Wednesday expected to give an update on the elections picture in the province.

Seventy-two percent of the province's vote has been captured, with the end in sight.

In the City of Cape Town, the Democratic Alliance (DA) is leading the pack with 62% of the vote, followed by the African National Congress (ANC) with 13%. 

In third place is the Good Party with 4% and the Cape Coloured Congress at 3%.

The Good Party's Brett Herron said that they were encouraged by their performance. 

"It also puts to an end to this stupid campaigning message that a vote for a new party or a small party is a wasted vote because in cities and our towns, for the first time, councils and residents will hear a different kind of message coming from councillors." 

 In the City of Cape Town, the Democratic Alliance (DA) is leading the pack with 62% of the vote, followed by the African National Congress (ANC) with 13%. In third place is the Good Party with 4% and the Cape Coloured Congress at 3%. 

With electricity issues at the centre of election gripes this year, parts of Eldorado Park are now having to get by without electricity.

The African National Congress (ANC) made ambitious promises to voters this year, committing to convince the national Treasury to scrap Soweto residents' electricity debt as it plans to take over the supply to communities from Eskom at some stage.

Electricity has been a huge concern for residents in Soweto for years and it's another hot potato for many other areas in Gauteng again this year.

Eldorado Park residents have been battling with inconsistent power supply for years, largely due to cable theft and illegal connections, resulting in Eskom switching off power as part of its "load reduction" timetable.

 Eldorado Park residents have been battling with inconsistent power supply for years, largely due to cable theft and illegal connections, resulting in Eskom switching off power as part of its 'load reduction' timetable. 

The ANC) has won the Mahikeng local municipality in the North West, bringing the total number of councils under its control to five. 

At least one municipality is hung, with 65% of the counting now completed.

The ruling party continued to lead in the province, with nearly 1.5 million votes in its favour.

Mahikeng has always been led by the ANC, but residents in the municipality said that factionalism and corruption led to the complete collapse of service delivery there. They said that roads had been neglected, waste was not collected and taps often run dry.

But these problems haven't stopped President Cyril Ramaphosa's party from securing the North West's capital. 

The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) said that its preliminary findings of the electoral satisfaction survey showed that there had been a minimal decline of trust in the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC).

Ninety percent of voters indicated that they trusted the commission in general.

The HSRC conducted the survey based on a sample of 300 voting stations across the country and was commissioned by the IEC to conduct the study.


The HSRC said that there had been a decline overall of confidence and trust in the electoral commission during the 2010s, however, it remained one of the most trusted institutions.

With a voter turnout of about 40% in Gauteng, the African National Congress (ANC) will be trying to hold on to power in areas where the party doesn't have a clear majority.

The ANC, so far, has clinched more than a million votes in Gauteng followed by the Democratic Alliance (DA) with 841,000 and the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF), which has secured 348,000.

Meanwhile, election newcomer ActionSA is making some inroads.

Vote counting has been completed in Midvaal, Lesedi, and Rand West City. In Lesedi and the Rand West City, the ANC has the most votes, but it’s a hung council as the party failed to receive 50% plus one votes.

In Mogale, with nearly 90% of the votes counted, the ANC is in the lead with 41% of the votes and the DA with 30% - this could result in another hung council.

Amid complaints over the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC)'s new voter management devices, some experts believe that the issues could open up the door for political parties to take the IEC to court. 

The electoral commission has strongly defended the devices, saying that they made the voting process more efficient, especially with tracking voters' registration details.

But some people have been left frustrated after not being able to cast their ballots, mostly due to their names not appearing on the voters' roll.

Lawyer at the Council for the Advancement of the Constitution, Dan Mafora, said that without proof, political parties could not take the IEC to court simply on the grounds that there were glitches with its new technology. 

Community members from Wynberg near Sandton said that they were tired of lies from the different political parties and said that they were given empty promises in the run-up to the local government elections.

There are more than 100 people living in more than 60 shacks in the informal settlement and community members there said that government had forgotten all about them.

Located on the Main Road next to Alexandra, the informal settlement once housed a brick factory. Now that building has become a group makeshift house with no toilets, electricity, or running water.

Election results are going from a trickle to more of a stream at the Western Cape's elections hub and they show the Democratic Alliance (DA) maintaining its lead.

Around 71% of the province's vote has now been captured. 

While the results centre is still quiet, representatives of political parties have started arriving.

They too are keeping one eye on the results dashboard and the other possibly on counterparts who they'll probably have to start negotiating with as this election has produced a record number of hung councils.

The DA's Albert Fritz said that they were elated they had eight municipalities where they had managed to secure a majority.

The ANC has blamed the stay away vote as the reason for its declining performance in some municipalities, like the Ekurhuleni Metro.

The low voter turnout has  been blamed on apathy, voter disgruntlement, and a breakdown of trust in South Africa's democracy.

Political analyst, Oscar van Heerden, from the University of Fort Hare, however says it is more complicated than that .

"I do think that of course we have to talk of reality that there is an element of our voters that are disillusioned, that are not interested in voting in the local government elections, for a variety of reasons.
But I think if we look globally, there is also a trend where voter turnout is quite low. The participation of people in elections is generally a low turnout."


Record low voter turnout was a prominent feature of Monday's elections and could be a sign of a maturing democracy.

 Final figures for turnout are not available as yet, but current statistics point to it being between 30 and 40%.

 Vote counting has picked up in Gauteng in the last few minutes with over 54% of votes now completed.
 
 Vote counting has been completed in Midvaal, Lesedi and Rand West City.
 
 In Lesedi and the Rand West City the ANC has the most votes but it’s a hung council as the party failed to receive 50% plus one votes. 
 
 In Mogale City with nearly 90% of the votes counted – the ANC is in the lead with 41% of the votes and the DA with 30% - this could also result in another hung council.

 In Emfulenin where the ANC hopes to return to power after it was placed under administration – the ANC is leading with 38% of the votes and the DA has 28% - most votes here have already been counted. 
 
 In Midvaal a DA stronghold the party has received an overwhelming majority of 62% and the ANC is far behind with 21% of the votes.

 With about a 40% low voter turnout in Gauteng – the ANC will be trying to hold on to power in some areas where they don’t have a clear majority. 
 
 Action SA the new party contesting in the three metros in the province is making some inroads. 

 The International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance says lower participation in elections does not necessarily mean that citizens are becoming less active in politics. 
 
 It adds that on the contrary as seen in South Africa the rise of other forms of activism such as mass protests and increased use of social media as a new platform of political engagement put serious pressure on governments and the way traditional political parties function. 

Voter turnout has been declining globally since the 1980s – with scholars and others in the politics arena warning that it is bad for democracy.

Several studies show that it usually means socioeconomically under privileged citizens vote less and as a result public policies benefit the rich.

This scenario is emerging in South Africa with the suburban voters keenly taking part in the elections while township and rural voters stayed away in the majority.

The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) said that it had captured 90% of the election results, which were now awaiting scanning and auditing.

This means that of the 64,502 results expected, 58,059 have been captured into the results system. 

The number of completed municipalities now stands at 111 from a total of 257.

In a short statement on Wednesday, the IEC said that it remained committed to finalising results expeditiously while taking care to ensure that all necessary verifications were enforced.

 As the country waits for the final count of the vote to be announced – political experts say while the voter turnout figures are a concern so far – there are misconceptions which need to be corrected. 
 The IEC yesterday announced that around 12,2 million people voted in Monday’s elections out of the 26,2 million registered voters. 
 
 While this spells a serious decline with some calling it a crisis. Some analysts say it is not all new to South Africa. 

The ANC appears to be limping in the North West province.

It has governed much of the province to the point of complete collapse and now the ANC in the North West has failed to secure more than 50% of the seats at one of the five councils where it leads. 

With 49% of votes counted in the North West, the party is in control of four councils with a more than 50% majority, namely Kgetleng, Mamusa, Naledi, and Maquassi Hills councils. However, in Lekwa-Teemane the party earned a little over 48% support - resulting in a hung council.

The ANC is eagerly awaiting results from the Rustenburg Local Municipality, where in 2016 the municipality was hung when the ANC secured only 43 seats out of the 89-seat council.

IEC STATEMENT: PROGRESS ON RESULTS CAPTURING PROCESS


Progress in relation to the finalization of results now stands at 69% of expected results.  At the level of capturing, 90% of results are already in the system awaiting scanning and auditing. This means of the 64 502 results expected, 58 059 have been 
captured into the results system. 
Of the 58 059 results captured, 44 707 have been scanned into an image and thus available. The completion rate in the Northern Cape is 89%, 82% in the Eastern Cape, Western Cape, Mpumalanga and the Free State are at 78%. The completion rate in the rest of the provinces ranges between 55 and 69%.
The Commission remains committed to finalizing results expeditiously while taking care to ensure that all necessary verifications are enforced. The number of completed municipalities now stands 111 from a total of 257.

As the country waits for the final count of the vote to be announced, political experts said that while the voter turnout figures were a concern so far, there were misconceptions that needed to be corrected. 

The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) on Tuesday announced that around 12.2 million people voted in Monday’s elections out of the 26.2 million registered voters.

While this spells a serious decline, with some calling it a crisis, some analysts said that it was not all new to South Africa. 

Voter turnout has been declining globally since the 1980s, with scholars and others in the political arena warning that it is bad for democracy.

 The ANC in the in the North West has failed to secure more than 50% of the seats at one of the five councils where it leads - resulting in its first hung municipality in the province so far. 
 
 With 49% of votes counted in the north west — the party is in control of four councils - with a more than fifty percent majority — however, the Lekwa-Teemane council is hung.
 
 The ANC is eagerly awaiting results from the rustenburg local municipality— where it failed to reach an outright majority in the 2016 local government. 
 
 So far the party has maintained its lead in the province — gaining 54% of the overall votes counted — followed by the EFF at 16% and the DA with 12.5%.
 

Early indications on Wednesday showed that the Democratic Alliance (DA) in the Knysna municipality scooped the most votes.

The Democratic Alliance received eight seats in the municipal council after Monday's local government elections. 

DA constituency head for Knysna, Dion George, told Eyewitness News that while the DA secured eight seats, the African National Congress (ANC) scored seven seats, and the Patriotic Alliance (PA) and the Knysna Independent Movement (KIM) had two seats each.

"It is a very fractured political scene in Knysna," said George.

He added that the party had not yet discussed how the municipality would be governed.

"Although the DA is the biggest party based on the number of seats, we will have to consider our options. There is a process that the party undertakes after elections, so once the results are verified we consider what these options are," George said, adding that they had not considered anything yet. 

The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) is under pressure to deliver on its promise to wrap up the counting soon and declare the official results on Thursday.

As vote counting continues, the results tallied so far have left feelings of misery for some and glee for others.

By late on Tuesday night, more than half the votes had been finalised and released.

The African National Congress (ACN) was facing further electoral decline, barely clinging on in Gauteng metros.

The Democratic Alliance (DA) meanwhile was celebrating wins in municipalities including Umgeni in KwaZulu-Natal, which was snatched from the ANC's grasp.

As IEC officials continue counting votes, the results log shows a three-horse between the African National Congress (ANC), the Democratic Alliance (DA) and the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) across the country, albeit with massive gaps between the parties. 

The ANC has bagged 46.4% of the vote so far, the DA is at 22.2% and the EFF at 10% nationally.

The country’s major metros are, however, much closer than the main picture.

In the hotly contested City of Tshwane, the DA is in the lead with 35.7% support, followed by the ANC at 32.4% while the EFF is tailing at 10.2%. 

The Tswane council was governed by a DA coalition government over the past five years which faced several hurdles along the way.

 The African National Congress (ANC) has bagged 46.4% of the vote so far, the Democratic Alliance (DA) is at 22.2% and the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) at 10% nationally but the country’s major metros are, however, much closer than the main picture. 

The ANC in the in the North West has failed to secure more than 50% of the seats at one of the five councils where it leads - resulting in its first hung municipality in the province so far. 

With 49% of votes counted in the North West  the party is in control of four councils  with a more than 50% majority  however, the Lekwa-Teemane council is hung.
 
The ANC is eagerly awaiting results from the Rustenburg local municipality— where it failed to reach an outright majority in the 2016  local government.  

So far the party has maintained its lead in the province  gaining 54% of the overall votes counted  followed by the EFF at 16%  and the DA with 12.5%.

 KwaZulu-Natal DA says it is ready to start the work in Umngeni local municipality promising to deliver. 
 
 The party won the municipality from the ANC in Monday’s elections. 
 
 This will be the first ever DA run municipality in the province. 

While the Democratic Alliance is set to retain control of its flagship, the Cape Town Metro, it’s also been given a bloody nose by voters in the Western Cape’s hinterland.

Coalitions will be the name of the game in the coming days due to smaller, often local, parties chipping away at support for both the DA and the ANC in areas outside the metro.

The DA has won in Drakenstein and the Cape Winelands, with 55% of the vote, and grew its support in Stellenbosch, taking 61% of the vote compared with the 57% it got in the 2016 local government elections. It also did better in Overstrand, and has won Mossel Bay with 66% of the vote.

But it lost its outright majority in Saldanha Bay on the Cape’s West Coast and in Bitou, where Plettenberg Bay is, its support dropped to 40%. The ANC’s decline there was even more precipitous, falling from 42 to 29%, according to the IEC’s results dashboard.

Research shows that low turnout is bad for democracy. It usually means that socioeconomically underprivileged citizens vote less and, as a result, public policies benefit the rich. Politicians feel less under public scrutiny and turn a deaf ear to the needs of the wider public. Instead of formulating general public policies serving society at large, governments can more easily target benefits to their core supporters.

 The IFP in KwaZulu-Natal has urged its public servants to serve community with dignity. 
 
 The party is experiencing significant growth in Northern parts of the province in Monday’s elections. 
 
 It says those who will be elected should abide by the pledge they made with the party. 

 With close to 60% of the total vote count completed nationwide – the IFP in KwaZulu Natal has been celebrating its notable takeover of a number of municipalities in the province. 
 
 The party’s orange colours have replaced the area which was predominantly occupied by the ANC’s green on the electoral map – as it looks to reposition itself as the go to party in the province. 
 
 The IFP, DA and Action SA are just some of the parties that have been celebrating making inroads in municipalities which it had been targeting over the electioneering period.

 Freedom Front Plus says lessons from 2016 means it will not negotiate its way through coalition government with just positions in mind. 
 
 The party – which has made in-roads in several municipalities across the country including in Tshwane, the North West, Mpumalanga and Limpopo. 
 
 With just under 60% of the votes counted FF-Plus is being predicted as one of these election’s key parties which could play the role of kingmaker for some parties. 
 
 The country’s largest political parties the ANC and the DA seem to not have garnered enough support to govern any of the metros. 
 
 FF-Plus’ Woutter Wessels says his party will not be holding negotiations with posts such as MMCs or even the deputy mayor in mind.

 The leader of civic movement — Forum For Service Delivery (F4SD)— says it will be up to its members to decide who to partner with in coalitions should the opportunity arise. 
 
 It’s becoming even more clear that there will be more hung municipalities out of this year’s local government elections with the increase in smaller parties and independent candidates set to split the vote. 
 
 In 2016 F4SD won 3% of the municipal vote —and now with less than half of the votes tallied in the North West — it has managed one seat in the Maquassi Hills Municiplaity.

The DA has won in Drakenstein, the Cape Winelands, with 55% of the vote and grew its support in Stellenbosch, taking 61% of the vote compared with the 57% it got in the 2016 local government elections. It also did better in overstrand, and has won mossel bay with 66% of the vote.

But it lost its outright majority in saldanha bay on the Cape’s West Coast and in Bitou, where Plettenberg Bay is, its support dropped to 40%. The ANC’s decline there was even more precipitous, falling from 42 to 29%, according to the IEC’s results dashboard.

While the Democratic Alliance is set to retain control of its flagship, the Cape Town metro, it’s also been given a bloody nose by voters in the Western Cape’s Hinterland.

Coalitions will be the name of the game in the coming days, due to smaller, often local, parties chipping away at support for both the DA and the ANC in areas outside the metro.

 
In the lead up to these elections – several demonstrations took place in Soweto as residents demanded the governing party’s intervention in resolving on-going power cuts. 
 
Duarte says ANC supporters were concerned about COVID-19 – its renewal project – with power outages have caused some serious damage to the party’s prospects across parts of Johannesburg.
 
She says the ANC will not let go of the battle to correct Eskom.

 Rolling blackouts have been listed as one of the major contributors to the ANC’s dwindling support at the polls. 
  
  The party’s Deputy Secretary General Jessie Duarte has told EyeWitness News the ANC had at least wanted a guarantee that there would be no load shedding in the lead up to the polls and if it had to happen it must at least be kept at a minimum. 
  
 Voters in its traditional strongholds stayed away again – like they did in 2016 – leading up to the ANC losing control of three metros and barely holding onto one through a coalition.

Ekurhuleni, which is considered an ANC stronghold, has been governed by the party through a coalition government since 2016.

But it’s unclear who will come out as the out as the main winner as the latest election results show a major shift in the political landscape.

Early indications in Gauteng are that the African National Congress (ANC) has lost substantial ground to the Democratic Alliance (DA) and Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) in Ekurhuleni.

He said very few parties in the world survive that.

Maimane responded to this on Twitter, saying the results were on Steenhuisen.

According to Mail & Guardian, Steenhuisen told journalists at IEC Results Operations Centre that part of the reason the party had lost support was that it "came out of that election with a leader having walked off the job".

One South Africa leader and former Democratic Alliance (DA) leader Mmusi Maimane has told his DA successor John Steenhuisen to stop blaming him for the party's drop in performance in the local government elections.

The IEC says that as of 19:30, 55% of the 64,502 results expected had been finalised. 

78% of results are already in the system waiting for scanning and auditing, says the IEC's Sy Mamabolo. He says they still aim to complete over 90% tonight.

The IEC's latest update is being broadcast live now.

Action SA has won its first ward.

The ANC is in control of Maquassi Hills where it holds 13 seats out of the 22 in council.

As at 4 pm on Tuesday, the ANC had 45 wards and two PR seats with over 211 votes in its favour.

Results at the North West IEC’s Mahikeng operations centre poured in on Tuesday afternoon after a slow start.

The African National Congress (ANC) has won control of one of the 18 councils in the North West with 17 more yet to be declared.

"The biggest loser in this election is not the ANC, it's in fact the DA," says Duarte.

She also adds the party will continue with its renewal project.

She adds #loadshedding has done a lot of damage with regards to denting its support base.

LIVE NOW: ANC DSG Jessie Duarte speaks to @tshidi_lee from the IEC Results Operations Centre. "We're worried about the low turnout," Duarte says. 

Checking back in in the NW. 

The IEC will have its first update briefing of the day at 8pm.

Meanwhile, in Ekurhuleni about 31% of the vote has been counted. There is no outright majority with the ANC on almost 38% and the DA on over 28% another area where a coalition is likely.

The DA has just over 40%, while the ANC has almost 29%.

The city appears to be set to have a coalition government with ActionSA playing a vital role in who governs. In Tshwane, vote counting has been slow with only around 12% counted.

The latest figures show that in the city of Joburg with 22% of the votes counted, the ANC has just over 37% followed by the da on around 21% and ActionSA on almost 18%.

The battle for various metros is continuing with majority governments appearing unlikely in a few areas. Nationally, 45% of the vote has been counted. And in Gauteng, 37% of the vote has been verified. 

The announcement is that the party has retained the Midvaal Municipality.

"When I entered this field of politics, leaving my comfortable business world, it was to unseat the ANC," Mashaba told Eyewitness News in an interview on Tuesday.

Sources told Eyewitness News that the ANC has informally approached Mashaba to consider working with them in the prized metro.

Action SA president Herman Mashaba on Tuesday again ruled out any coalition with the African National Congress (ANC).

Action SA president Herman Mashaba on Tuesday again ruled out any coalition with the African National Congress (ANC).

The DA’s political head for George, Mimmy Gondwe, said it was early days in the world of vote counting and remained confident that the party would remain in control of the George Municipality.

Opposition party agents who observed onsite vote counting earlier told Eyewitness News that the George council would likely be hung and governed by a coalition.

The Democratic Alliance (DA) is still hoping for an outright win in the George Municipality in the Western Cape despite opposition party predictions that it would lose its governing majority.

IEC confirms 90% of results will be concluded by tonight.

This is a historic win for the DA as it is the first-ever municipality that it wins with a majority.

uMngeni previously was under the ANC.

The DA has won the uMngeni Municipality (Howick and surrounding areas) in KZN.

Malema thanks EFF supporters who came out to vote.

The latest from NW.

Another political battleground is the Nelson Mandela Bay where the ANC is certain it will taste victory.

 

This despite a number of DA strongholds still unaccounted for in the vote.

The DA won 62% of the vote in the Breede River and has now also won control in Hessequa and Swartland.

 

Councils in Kannaland, Cederberg, Laingsburg and Prince Albert are hung and to that list can now be added Saldanha and Langeberg.

 

In Saldanha, the Democratic Alliance won 13 seats, the African National Congress six and the GOOD Party four.

 

In the Langeberg the DA won 10 seats, the ANC six and the Freedom Front Plus, two.

 

Counting and verifying seems to be taking time in voting districts in cape town itself, where the da appears to be heading for a reduced majority. The party won a 66% majority in the mother city in 2016.

Big parties are desperate to hang on to crucial municipalities while the smaller ones are making inroads confident, they could hold sway in many areas.

 

Meanwhile in the Western Cape, the Democratic Alliance (DA) has so far won control of three councils.

 

Several other councils appear to be hung, where no single party has won an outright majority.

As the country grapples with general discontent demonstrated through the poor showing at the local government elections, political parties are nervously focusing on results emerging from the country's metros.

"I think we need to look at the history of Phoenix, and I think the history of Phoenix is quite simple, that the government failed the community of Phoenix, eThekwini and the rest of the province during the unrest, and I think we all need to acknowledge that there were heroes and there were villains across our province."

On Tuesday DA KZN leader Francois Rodgers said the party stood by its word. He made the remarks to journalists at the Independent Electoral Commission results operation centre in Durban.

The Democratic Alliance (DA) in KwaZulu-Natal insists that those linked to the July violence in Phoenix are heroes.

The grandmother attended an ANC rally a few days before election day where President Cyril Ramaphosa addressed voters in the Sedibeng District. Evaton Ward 19 councillor Elias Mokoena and other Emfuleni Municipality officials have visited the family to offer their condolences.

‘Khosi’, as she is affectionately known in the community, complained of chest pains before asking her spouse to get her water. She then collapsed and died at the voting station.

Makhosazana Tshabalala waited in the queue with her spouse Fanafuthi Nkabinde at the Saint Apostolic Church in Evaton on Cradock Road to cast her vote.

In some tragic news, a 57-year-old woman passed away shortly after voting in Evaton Central in the Vaal on Monday.

The IEC had already had a plan in place for load shedding. It says it will insulate capturing sites in order minimise the impact on the results collation process. 

The National Results Operations Centre does have generators that will be used in the event load shedding affects the Pretoria West area. 


DA leader John Steenhuisen has called a special press conference to announce that the party has managed to retain the Kouga Municipality. 

The party managed to get 16 seats out of the 29. 

Pundits predicted big losses for the DA in the Kouga Municipality in the Eastern Cape, but party leader John Steenhuisen is pleased enough with the party's outright win to make an announcement about its projections:

"My team have given me the excellent news that we have won Kouga Municipality with 16 seats, 11 for ANC. 

When he was asked about possibly resigning should the party have a bad show - Steenhuisen pointed out that its still early - with only about a third of the results counted and verified.

The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) said just 12.2 million people voted in the local government elections. 

This is an unprecedented low voter turnout since the advent of democracy in South Africa. 

Although just 30% of the votes have been counted so far, the IEC has painted a grim picture of the voter turnout. 

IEC chief electoral officer Sy Mamabolo said that this could be blamed on a number of factors, including the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Opposition parties in the Garden Route town of George said that all indications were that the Democratic Alliance (DA) would lose its outright majority in the municipality.

In 2016, the Democratic Alliance garnered just over 55% of the votes in the area but as the preliminary counts of wards in the area concluded, party agents were predicting an upset.

The IEC has yet to verify these claims as it continues its counting and auditing process.

As things look right now, the Democratic Alliance (DA) is in the lead in Emfuleni, an African National Congress (ANC)-run municipality that was placed under administration in 2018 and is in debt to the tune of R4.5 billion.
The DA has so far around 27,000 counted votes.
So far, about 19,000 residents have given the ANC another chance to govern the municipality while nearly 8,000 votes have been counted for the Freedom Front Plus.

 Action SA's Michael Beaumont says the party will start strategising for the 2024 elections as soon as these elections are behind them.
 The newcomer appears to have made a reasonable impact contesting its first local government elections, even picking up some surprise wards in KwaZulu-Natal in early results. 
 Beaumont says the party's focus is on building a majority by appealing to voters across racial lines, something which early results in Soweto and Johannesburg suburbs suggest it could do.

 The DA in KwaZulu-Natal insists that those linked to the July violence in Phoenix are heroes. 
 The party has been largely criticized for its elections campaign poster in the township - which read - "The ANC calls racist - the DA calls heroes".
 While it removed the poster and apologised – DA KZN leader Francois Rodgers say they stand by their word.

 Opposition parties in the Garden Town of George say all indications are the DA will lose its outright majority in the Municipality.
 
In 2016 the Democratic Alliance garnered just over 55% of the votes in the area. But as the preliminary counts of wards in the area concluded party agents are predicting an upset.
 
 The IEC has yet to verify these claims as it continues its counting and auditing process. 

The IEC says just 12.2 million people voted in the local government elections. 
This is an unprecedented low voter turnout since the advent of democracy in the South Africa.  
Although just 30% of the votes have been counted so far - the IEC has painted a grim picture of the voter turnout. 
IEC CEO Sy Mamabolo says this could be blamed on a number of factors including the COVID-19 pandemic. 
 There are 26,2 million registered voters in South Africa - however 42,6 million people are eligible to do so - with over 40% of them choosing not to. 
The IEC says it expects to finalise 90% of the vote. 

Eyewitness News Editor-in-Chief Mahlatse Mahlase chats to the GOOD party leader Patricia de Lille on the 2021 local government elections.

The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) expects the bulk of election results to be captured and verified by the end of Tuesday.

Teams at the more than 23,000 voting stations concluded the preliminary count overnight.

IEC CEO Sy Mamabolo said that the numbers needed to be captured and verified before they were added to the national leaderboard.

"It is estimated that 90% of the results will be finalised by this evening. The balance of the 10% will take another 24 hours to complete," Mamabolo said.

 The Eyewitness News team reflects on the progress of the 2021 local government elections. 

As the number of councils that have been won increase, so have the number of hung councils, indicating that coalitions will once again be the order of the day in this year's local government elections.

Partnerships between parties haven't always worked in the best interest of voters, with many leading to the collapse of municipal councils due to political differences.

With 22% of the votes in so far, the African National Congress (ANC) is now leading with eight councils, the majority of which is in the Northern Cape. In Gauteng, the party has control of Lesedi Municipality.

Voting may be done and dusted but for the next few days more than just the memories will remain.  Millions of South Africans who cast their ballots were marked with indelible ink - a security measure to make sure that no one votes more than once. 
Now many are asking how to get rid of the unsightly stain. 
Baking soda, dishwashing liquid, nail polish remover, bleach, and even toothpaste. These suggestions may seem ridiculous to some, but they seemed popular for those desperate to remove the ink. 

Mamabolo:The National Results Operations Centre does have generators which will be used in the event load shedding affects the Pretoria West area.

Mamabolo: The Commission has noted the announcement by Eskom that the national electricity Grid is currently constrained and there may be a need to shed load sometime in the course of the day. Discussions are underway to insulate capturing sites in order 
minimise the impact on the results collation process. 

Mamabolo: These voters were entitled to participate in the election. There was a total of 238 403 voters who were eventually placed on the MEC 7 list which was centrally connected with all VMD’s. 129 615 of those on this lists voted in their correct voting stations.

Mamabolo: Given technical glitches during the registration weekend, some voters were captured manually while others were captured on VMD’s but not uploaded. 

Mamabolo: If voters present themselves at a voting stations where they are not on the voters’ roll but there is proof that they had applied for registration at that voting station before the date of the proclamation of the election, such voters are entitled to vote using the procedure prescribed in section 7(2) of the Municipal Electoral Act.

Mamabolo: The Commission believes that voter management devices were the mainstay equipment for this election. These devices have ensured that we continue to meet the constitutional courts injunction that voters only vote in the wards in which they are registered and that every voter must have an address on the voters’ roll.

Mamabolo:   n the analysis of voter turnout, the COVID context in which the election happened should not be forgotten. The national message has been that people must not be in congregate environments. 

Mamabolo: The Commission had anticipated the prospect of a lower voter turnout already in July and approached the Constitutional Court. Nonetheless, the Commission implemented an extensive education and communication campaign to ensure that voters turnout to out. This included educational programmes that assured voters that it will safe to be at a voting station. 

Mamabolo: The Commission would like to call upon all leaders of political parties to act and speak responsibly as the result collation process unfolds. 

Mamabolo: The Northern Cape has completed 74% of its results, followed by Western Cape at 46% and in third position comes Free State at 26%. The rest of the provinces completion rate range between 15 and 37%.

Mamabolo:  It is estimated that 90% of results would be finalized by evening. T The balance of 10% would take another 24 hours to complete.

 Mamabolo: 90% of the results will be finalised by this evening. Northern Cape has completed just over 70% of the voting counting.

 Chief Electoral Officer Sy Mamabolo: As of 10:30am 27% of the counting had been done. An independent audit firm has been appointed.

With 22% of the votes in so far - the ANC is now leading with eight councils - with the majority in the Northern Cape. 

In Gauteng the party now has control of Lesedi Municipality. 

The DA has also scored more councils - now standing at three in the Western Cape. 

Over one point eight million votes have been counted. 

At last count last night when voting stations closed - the overall voter turnout stood at 8,7 million. 

As the number of councils won increase  so has the amount of hung councils indicating that coalitions will once again be the order of the day in local government. 

The partnerships between parties haven’t always worked in the best interest of South Africans in the past - with many leading to the collapse of municipal councils - mainly in the metros due to political differences. 

It is still too early to get the big picture, but parties have started counting small gains in wards and local municipalities.
 
The FF Plus was smiling this morning after taking 3 wards off the DA so far, while the DA says their black vote in Midvaal has grown.

Results for smaller wards have started trickling in overnight and Wouter Wessels from the FF Plus says he’s satisfied:
 
"So far it's very early days but Mpumalanga has surprised us. We have won two wards off the DA in Lekwa Municipality and we are quite surprised by that but we did work hard there we had good candidates. And then at this stage officially we won a ward in the Northern Cape in Hope Town area."


As of 8 this morning the DA was sitting on 48% of the vote in Nelson Mandela Bay metro with the ANC a distant second with 35% with just a handful of voting districts counted. 

Newcomer the Defenders Of the People or DOP - was in fourth position - securing just over 2% of the vote - at this stage.

The DA's Helen Zille's accused the ANC of using smaller parties like DOP to split the opposition vote.

ANC provincial chairperson and Eastern Cape Premier Oscar Mabuyane has denied propping up smaller parties to unseat the da in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro.

He's accusing DA veteran Helen Zille of “panicking”.

The DA's accused the ANC of funding and working with smaller parties on election day in many DA strongholds in the metro.

Many voters in the Boland made their mark in the local government elections on Monday despite saying that they didn't have much faith in any of the political parties.

Some residents in Paarl and in Stellenbosch have accused politicians of making empty promises, saying that their circumstances had not changed over the years. 

Residents in Mbekweni, Kayamandi, and Cloetesville highlighted similar problems including a lack of housing, electricity issues, and high rates of unemployment.

The Democratic Alliance (DA) is leading in the City of Cape Town with just over 63% of the vote on Tuesday morning. 

With just over 87,000 votes tallied so far in the City of Cape Town, the DA leads the pack with 63%, the African National Congress (ANC) with just over 9% and the Cape Coloured Congress (CCC) with almost 7%.

By 8am on Tuesday, 65 of 801 voting districts were processed.


 The ANC is so far leading in the City of Johannesburg with 19, 000 votes of those already counted followed by the DA and in third place in Joburg so far Action SA.
  
 The first time contestant – Action SA – which is being led by the City of Joburg’s former mayor Herman Mashaba has gained almost 22,000 votes in Gauteng so far almost half of those votes emanating from Joburg voters.
  
 Looking at the leader board for Tshwane so far the DA is leading with 18,000 votes followed by the ANC’s 11,000,  and  the Freedom Front plus in third place. 

 Politicians are watching vote-counting very closely on Tuesday morning, with political parties mulling the prospect of legal action after the names of some registered voters were not on the roll.

On Monday night, the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) claimed that only about 6,000 voters were disenfranchised due to faulty voter management devices.

 On Monday night, the IEC claimed that only about 6,000 voters were disenfranchised due to faulty voter management devices. Wouter Wessels from the Freedom Front Plus, however, said that up to 70,000 voters could have been affected. 

As the election results trickle in, South Africans have begun unpacking the implications of the unprecedented low voter turnout. 

The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) on Monday night said that about 30% of registered voters turned out as many opted to stay home for various reasons.

With close to 900,000 votes counted so far, electoral experts have started asking serious questions about what the country should make of the turnout figures from Monday.

The Western Cape results centre at Century City is quiet for now.

But as the hours tick by, more ballots are counted and the outcome of the 2021 municipal polls become clearer.

It's a drip-feed of results for the time being and the anxiety and excitement is palpable.


At this stage, the Democratic Alliance (DA) is leading in the province, with just over 50%. It’s so far won 28 wards. 

This is followed by the African National Congress (ANC), which has secured 11 wards won in the province. 

Millions of South Africans made their way to the polls on Monday to cast their vote in the local government elections.

Residents in Cape Town said that they voted for change and for better and safer communities for their children. 

From Mitchells Plain to Constantia people braved the cold and rain, some wearing jackets and holding umbrellas, to make their voices heard. 

"I would like to see things change for a better and a safer environment for my children," said a Cape Town resident after casting her vote on Monday. 

Police say officers acted on the instructions of presiding officers in two specific incidents which gained a fair amount of attention on voting day. 

Early on Monday Newzroom Afrika journalist Ziniko Mhlaba was briefly detained after he was accused of somehow distracting an IEC official in Soweto.
Hours later in Nelson Mandela Bay, DA federal leader Helen Zille was frog-marched out of a voting station after she was accused of canvassing in the queue. She denied the accusation.

Amid fears that gusting wind and rain would dampen voters' enthusiasm to go and vote, provincial electoral officer Michael Hendrickse said that by late on Monday night the Western Cape voter turnout had improved to 36% from just 26% recorded at 5pm.

The Western Cape's first electoral result came from a tiny voting district in ward 12 in Oudtshoorn.

Vote counting continues on Tuesday morning after what analysts have described as a dismal turnout at the municipal elections. 

By 5pm on Monday, just over 8 million qualifying voters had cast their ballots from 26 million names on the voters roll.

One of the biggest frustrations with voters appeared to have been the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC)'s newly introduced voter management devices (VMDs).

Disappointed over poor voter turnout, ActionSA leader Herman Mashaba is blaming the African National Congress (ANC) for the dismal voter showing at the polls. 

He told Eyewitness News that there was a huge challenge in getting people to believe in the power of their individual actions.

Mashaba was reacting to news that by 5pm on Monday that only 8 million out of 26 million eligible South Africans had cast their vote in the local government elections.

With ballots still being counted on Tuesday morning, the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) said it was still too early to say voter turnout for the local government elections had been disappointing.

Pundits said all indications were that many chose to stay away from the polls on Monday, but the IEC said it was too early to conclude that the country was likely to see its worst voter turnout yet, cautioning against apportioning blame until the final tally. 

As the election results trickle in - South Africans have begun unpacking the implications of the unprecedented low voter turnout.

The IEC last night said about 30% of registered voters turned out as many opted to stay home for various reasons.

With close to 900,000 votes counted so far electoral experts have started asking serious questions about what the country should make of the turnout figures from Monday.

Residents in different townships where it appears the lowest numbers were recorded told Eyewitness News of difficulty understanding whats in it for them once they voted as experience had taught them otherwise.

Questions are now being asked about the risk of a threat to the legitimacy of those who will make it to public office if indeed the final turnout figures are as dismal as current projections.

Of the results that are in, the nationally governing ANChas clinched just two councils.

  The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) introduced the voter management device (VMD) for this year's elections, which replaced the old "zip-zip" devices. As voting took place across SA on Monday, the new devices experienced glitches. They cost IEC just over R500 million. 

 The Western Cape results centre at Century City is quiet for now.
 But as the hours tick by more ballots are counted and the outcome of the 2021 municipal polls will become clearer.
 At this stage the DA is leading in the province with just over 50%. It’s so far won 28 wards. 
 This is followed by the ANC which has secured 11 wards won in the province. 
 The Western Cape’s tallying is 21% complete. 

The dysfunctional ANC led Tswaing local municipality came under the floodlight in the national council of provinces last month - after it was placed under administration for failing to deliver the most basic of services

But  despite reports that factional battles had led to the municipality’s collapse —with two people claiming to be mayor following a no confidence vote—  the ANC’s IPC convener Suzan Dantjie says she believes residents still have faith in the ANC’s leadership. 

Five municipalities in the North West are under administration and two have been dissolved but the ANC in the province says while its aware of issues plaguing these councils  its confident residents still have faith in the governing party.

The Tswaing local municipality  is the latest to suffer such interventions  after it was dissolved just days before the elections. 

North West residents who voted say they hope the incoming leadership will urgently attend to service delivery issues at failing municipalities across the province. 

There were already concerns that more than 13 million eligible voters had not even bothered to register for the polls.
Political analyst Gogo Aubrey Matshiqi  says what’s happened is beyond voter apathy or even anger directed at the governing party.

The IEC says its too early to conclude  that the country is likely to see its worst voter turn out. Cautioning against apportioning blame until the final tally. 

The first local government election results are coming in. The Umzvimvubu municipality's Mvombo Lodge in the Eastern Cape. The voting district had 10 registered voters.

The polls are now closed but those still in the queue are still allowed to cast their ballots. There have been reports of long queues in Centurion.
 
Millions of South Africans went to the polls on Monday but there are concerns about a possible low voter turnout.



Here's an update from Helen Zille on her being manhandled:

Journalists are currently trying to contact me for details of the snippet of news released about my being “manhandled” out of a voting station in Nelson Mandela Bay today.  So here is the background

Election day is an enormous logistic exercise.  In each town and city there are hundreds of volunteers, assigned different tasks:  phoning voters, transporting voters, checking IDs, collating statistics, managing the media, dealing with a myriad of queries and much more.

My task today, in Nelson Mandela Bay, was two-fold:  greeting voters and “walking the queues”.

Greeting voters is self-explanatory.  I enjoy doing it.  

But when long queues start to form, the job of “walking the queues” becomes more important. It involves encouraging people to stay in the queue, no matter how long it takes and how frustrated they get, so that they can cast their vote rather than go home.

Queue walking has never been as important in any election before as it was today.  The IEC had a new voter-processing system, which took an inordinately long time per voter.  And so, from as early as 09h00 this morning, especially in DA strongholds, long queues started to form, snaking around buildings.

At a voting station at Wonder-Wonings, the IEC’s Presiding Officers took a sensible decision early on.  They split the queue into two, by alphabetical surname.  One queue was for surnames A – M.  The second queue was for surnames N-Z.  And from that moment on the queues moved and the wait was no longer than 45 minutes.

Not so at most of the other voting stations in the DA-voter-rich Northern Areas of the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro.

At these stations, from about 09h30, I switched my job from voter-greeting to queue-walking.

I was very careful to ensure that I did not canvas anywhere within the IEC’s boundary line.  Once, outside the boundary line, when I encountered a woman waiting in a DA blue T-shirt, I said “Hou by die Blou”.  We hugged. That was that.

As I walked the queues, I said two things:  “Thank you for coming out today” and “Please wait in the queue.  It will take long time but it is very important that you vote”.

I have done queue walking like this in most elections, and there has never been a problem.  It was an especially important task today as voters, waiting in the howling wind and strong sun, were especially taxed by the weather.

At Ferndale Park Primary, I found a particularly long queue, snaking around the building.  Voters were already angry  --  at 09h30 in the morning.  Many said they had been waiting for well over an hour.  I walked up the queue, urging them to remain.  Using my authorisation form, I went into the voting station, signed a book and spoke to the Presiding Officer.

I have posted a picture of her on this post, courtesy of her Facebook Profile.  Yes, this is the person the IEC put as the Presiding Officer in a ward in a DA stronghold.  Her name is Kholiwe Yolanda Latola.

She identified her super as a Matolindile Zingithwa, a well-known luminary of SADTU, the vocally anti-DA Teachers’ Union.

Their attitude showed.  

They were entirely disinterested in resolving the extreme slowness of the voting process and over the course of several interactions it was plain that they were only interested in asserting their authority rather than assisting voters.

After observing the scene, I could see immediately where the hold-up was.  It was in the slow manual-input of voters’ id numbers into a tablet.  I then tried to establish how long the voting would take by timing this interaction on my phone’s stop-watch.

I positioned myself two meters from where this device was being used to manually capture ID numbers.  I did not interfere with a single voter, nor with any officer performing his or her duties.  I merely timed the process.

The shortest time it took to capture an ID number was 30 seconds.  The longest was 90 seconds.  Multiplying the average by the number of people in the queue, I calculated that it would take about 4 – 5 hours for the people at the back of the queue to get to the front.

Ms Latola then told me to leave the voting station.  I said I had the required authorisation to be there, and then suggested that she use her authority to divide the queue on the basis of alphabetical surnames, as had happened in a nearby Voting Station.  She was not interested in what I had to say, and indeed, did not seem to know anything about this Standard Operating Procedure, that was being applied at some other voting stations.  Either that, or else was being deliberately obstructive.  
I then left the voting station.  I phoned our IEC representative in Nelson Mandela Bay, to explain that Ms Latola seemed to have no idea of the simple mechanism of dividing the queue into two, and asked that the matter be escalated to the IEC provincially because according to my calculation, people would wait in that queue for five hours and more.

I then went on my rounds to other voting stations.  At about 12h30 I returned to Fernwood Park Primary only to find the queue even longer, and that the double queue system had still not been implemented. 

Once again, I walked up the queue from the back, thanking people for coming, and asking them to stay in the queue, even though many of them had been waiting for hours.  When I made my way to the front of the queue, two of the ANC party agents told me to stop canvassing in the queue.  I told them I was not canvassing, I was urging people to stay in the queue despite their intense frustration at the inordinate delay.

Using my written authorisation, I again entered the voting station and approached Ms Latola.  She immediately snapped at me that I was canvassing in the queue.  I said that was not true, and told her not to accuse me of this when she had no evidence to that effect at all.

A burly policeman, Warrant Officer A Botha, approached and before I could say a word, he instructed me to leave.  I presented my authorisation, and said I had a right to be there.  With that he instructed me to leave, grabbed me and frog-marched me out of the building.  I told him to let me go or I would charge him with assault.

I tried to rip myself free of his grasp but he was very powerful and frog-marched me all the way to the gate.  My colleague filmed the last segment of his violence, at which point he lunged over and grabbed her cell phone.  She tried to get it back but he turned and went into the building.

We then drove straight to the Bethelsdorp Police station to lay a charge.  I returned to our campaign headquarters in the Northern Areas.  There our Mayoral candidate, Nqaba Banga, arrived and together we went back to the voting station to see what could be done about the unlawful blocking of my access, the untrue allegations that I had canvassed in the queue, and more especially, to get the queue divided into two to move more quickly.  By this stage the supervisor, Mr Zingithwa was there, and he let off a volley of abuse as well.

We realised we would not get any rationality, let alone proper queue management from them, so we returned to the headquarters where I received advice to lodge a formal dispute.

After a lengthy wait, Ms Latola spoke to us in a nearby booth.  I was eventually provided with a dispute form, which I filled in.  During the course of this exercise, a woman who identified herself as a Ms Norris arrived, to say her elderly father had previously been registered in Bedford, but had re-registered at the Ferndale Park Primary school.  He had waited for hours, only to find he was not on the voters’ roll.

Ms Latola said:  “He is supposed to have the papers to show that he re-registered.”  

Having been through a re-registration process myself, I know that is not necessarily true, especially if one re-registers on-line.  

When it was clear that the presiding officer was not going to do anything to resolve the legitimate query, I asked Ms Norris if she could give me her father’s ID number and I would then send an sms to 38210 to check whether his re-registration had been successful.

Ms Latola then let rip at me again, saying I was interfering with voters.  I said this was not true.  The persons were not voting.  They were not even in the queue.  They had merely asked her a question. I had witnessed her entirely unsatisfactory answer and tried to help the voter myself.  Because I did not have my cell phone with me, I asked Ms Norris for her phone number so that I could check with her later to tell her if her father was registered.  

Ms Latola promptly popped another proverbial blood-vessel because I had taken Ms Norris’s cellphone number and put it in my pocket, so that I could call and help her later when I had my phone, to help her resolve the problem with her father’s registration.

The matter was rapidly turning into farce.   Ms Latola again summoned the police to say I was interfering with a voter  --  for merely taking the telephone number to help resolve a problem, as it is both my right and duty to do.

When I had finished writing out my formal objection, I noted it was past 15h30.  I said I had requested the queue to be divided into two sections at 09h30 in the morning, that I had escalated the matter to the IEC provincially where I was promised a response, and six hours later, nothing had happened.
Ms Latola said she had asked “someone” to divide the queue, but could not say who.  A colleague of mine went to check and returned to say the queue had not been divided.  I then, again, requested Ms Latola to implement the standard practice of queue division.

It was at this point that she issued the immortal South African phrase:  “I am now on lunch”.  And that was that.  She was hungry, she said, and she had a right to eat.

I bit my tongue and left the building.

This was only one instance of the IEC’s incompetence.  I encountered several today.  But this level of obstructiveness only from Ms Latola.

Cadre deployment, right down the level of individual voting stations, has destroyed the IEC.  

The delays today at the Fernwood Park Primary Voting Station were clearly deliberate, and scores of voters left without voting in this DA stronghold.  The same, apparently, applies in many other places.

If elections lose their credibility in South Africa, the IEC will have much to answer for.  As I experienced today at Fernwood Park Primary.









A smaller political party, which claims its name and logo were deliberately mixed up on the ballot paper and initially wanted to have the local government elections halted, said it had now accepted the error by the IEC.

Some voters insist on being allowed in voting stations after 9pm.

While larger parties continue putting on a show of confidence, smaller parties have been focused on what the low voter turnout could mean.

With political analysts predicting more hung municipalities, smaller parties are positive that they will have a say in who governs the country's municipalities.

9pm has hit and stations are closed. 

The counting of votes will begin at 10pm.

Robben Island results are expected in the early hours of the morning.

The IEC has said it has not received the report about the incident where Helen Zille was manhandled.

Voters have been told that they will not be denied the ability to vote if they are in lines by 9pm.

Masuku: In the EC, the 19 voting stations that did not open because of protests or civil unrest have been opened.

Masuku: All the 20 voting stations that did not open in KZN due to protests have now been opened.

Masuku: Investigations have been conducted into the shortage of ballot papers in several voting districts.

Masuku says they are working on addressing complaints from some voters who registered to vote but can't find their names or can prove the MEC 7 List. "The commission is attending and responding to complaints as they are raised."

You can check your voter registration details by dialing star 120 star followed by 4 then by 2 then hash. Or you can SMS your identity document to 32810. Or you can reach out to the contact centre on 0800 11 8000 until 9 pm tonight to assist voters.

Masuku: Voters are reminded to vote only where they are registered. 

Masuku: We encourage eligible voters who have not voted to use the remaining hours to go out and vote.

Masuku: Over 8 million South Africans have cast their vote as of 5 pm.

Masuku: Voting in the municipal elections is progressing in the country.

Commissioner of electoral commission Nomsa Masuku gives an update

IEC begins it's presser.

A case of theft has been opened against the police officer.

According to Ipid, someone was taking a video of the incident using Zille's phone and the police confiscated the device.

It's alleged a voter who was waiting in the queue reported Zille to the officials for campaigning.

The presiding officer at the Fernwood Park Primary School in Bethelsdorp then called the police.

Democratic Alliance (DA) federal leader Helen Zille has allegedly been manhandled by a police officer at a polling station in the Eastern Cape and now the matter is being investigated by the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (Ipid).

The 7pm briefing has been rescheduled for 8pm.

The IEC will have its last briefing for the day now at 7pm.

Democratic Alliance (DA) Federal Council chairperson Helen Zille said on Monday that her biggest fear for Nelson Mandela Bay was the African National Congress (ANC) regaining control of the metro.

The countdown to the closing of voting stations has officially begun. Three hours to go.

The IEC will have its next update briefing at 7pm.

The IFP has condemned the incident.

ANC supporters were allegedly chasing them away and telling them that the IFP was not supposed to be in that area. In addition, ANC supporters allegedly threatened to kill them if they remained in that area. 

According to the IFP candidate, his vehicle was attacked this morning at Entukusweni Hall, and windows were broken. Then, while at Ximba Hall, the candidate and party agents were attacked in front of the police, who allegedly did not attempt to assist them. 

The IFP says it is shocked by the reported attacks on its candidate, Mr Percy Zungu, and his party agents, in Ward 1, kwaXimba Traditional Area 

An IFP candidate has allegedly been attacked by ANC members in the eThekwini region. 

However, voters in Boksburg complained about poor service delivery, with the lack of water and electricity being the biggest headache to communities.

Mantashe said he was confident the party would take the full majority of the Johannesburg metro, saying they had delivered services to residents.

Mantashe was casting his vote at Freeway Park primary school in Ward 43 in Boksburg on Monday.

"The biggest opposition this election is Eskom because they do all sorts of irrational things at times and we must swim against that wave," he said.

African National Congress (ANC) national chairperson Gwede Mantashe said on Monday that Eskom was a pressing issue that needed to be dealt with.

We reached out to our readers to ask if any are experiencing issues at voting stations. Here are some of the responses we have received:

  • Tania Smith - Yes, at Blaauwberg Community Hall [WC]. Devices not working, incompetent IEC staff, absolutely atrocious!!!
  •  Johan Nothnagel - Yes, my daughter couldn't vote. Said she not registered, after online registration
    Jacqueline Steyn - In Melkbosstrand, Sunningdale and Tableview ballots not being stamped
  • Debbie Davies - In Skeerpoort, there was an issue with the station being offline. The gentleman who scans your ID and prints a slip was making duplicates and putting one copy in his pocket, not sure what that was all about. But the police were on duty to sort it out.
    That same printer was having printing issues and had to be assisted to print.
  • Warren Thomson - Yes I was told my ID book was illegal so I can't vote but the scan machine printed me a zip code and my father was told online he was registered but none doesn't appear on the voters roll.

ANC national chairperson Gwede Mantashe voted at the Freeway Park Primary School in Boksburg. Mantashe said he was hopeful that his party would win an outright majority in the Ekurhuleni Metro, saying they had delivered services to residents.

If the party is successful, De Villiers could soon add mayor to his CV. He admits he is nervous but he believes he is up to the task.

De Villiers, who is the Good party's mayoral candidate for the Drakenstein municipality, said he was happy with the work they did in the area in the lead up to these elections.

Former Springboks rugby coach turned politician Peter de Villiers cast his ballot at a pre-primary school in Paarl East on Monday.

Here's a summary of the recent IEC briefing:

Mashinini said that despite isolated incidents, they were satisfied with the voting process so far.

He admitted that there had been several isolated incidents across the country including the arrest of a Newzroom Afrika journalist on Monday morning.

Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) chair Glen Mashinini, in a media update from the results operating centre in Tshwane, said 99% of the 23,000 voting stations opened on time.

Over 3.5 million South Africans have so far cast their ballots across the country in the local government elections.

Good party leader Patricia de Lille braved the heavy rain in Cape Town on Monday to make her mark, saying that she was relieved that voting day was finally here.

"To me, it's come rain or sunshine today, we have to do our civil duty, we have to go and vote," she told Eyewitness News, adding that election day was for voters to judge and to choose their political party.

He described his experience while campaigning for elections, explaining “This has been a very enriching process of interfacing and interacting with our people, getting to know their aspirations, their hopes and their disappointments and engaging with them without any fear and with great humility."

He said that was good news for the ANC, adding: “We are looking forward, as the African National Congress, to an overwhelming victory here in Johannesburg and an overwhelming victory in the various metros."

Ramaphosa said that he had received positive views from South Africans promising to cast their vote.

Ramaphosa and his wife, Dr Tshepo Motsepe, cast their votes at the Hitekani Primary School in Chiawelo.

In Soweto, Ramaphosa said that he was looking forward to an outright win in Johannesburg and other metros in Gauteng.

President Emeritus of the IFP Prince Mangosuthu Buthelezi MP will vote at 2pm at the Buthelezi Traditional Court House, Mahlabathini.

If you've forgotten how the process goes... Here's a quick reminder... 
 
 You can only vote in the district in which you are registered... And you need to take your identity document with you.
 
 Mashinini says electoral officers will then find your name on the voters roll and cross you off... And hand you your ballot papers.

 

And a reminder if you are voting in a local municipality... You'll get three ballots - the third for your district municipality.
 
 There will be a lot of sanitising and distancing at every step. And you won't be allowed in if you are not wearing a mask.
 
 And then of course there's the issue of the pens.

So you can bring your own. Or use the commission's one. But you can't take an "in booth selfie" and post it to social media.

 

Players who make mistakes get a warning and yellow card in the hope that they can apologise and learn from their mistakes. It is only unrepentant cheaters who cannot obey the rules of the game, and those who commit serious transgressions, who should be issued with red cards, writes former Springboks coach Peter de Villiers.

Last month, former ANC president Thabo Mbeki called on South Africa to hold the party to its promises, warning that if the governing party really was too big to fail and if it did let South Africa down, then the country would fail, too.

Remember that alleged Gareth Cliff racist incident – the latest one, that is?

Well, DA leader John Steenhuisen has been desperately defending his behaviour during a panel discussion on Gareth Cliff's Burning Platform show.

 

In case you missed it Steenhuisen and community activist Mudzuli Rakhivhane became embroiled when Cliff insinuated that racism was not as big a problem as poor service delivery.

Police said that a journalist and cameraman were forcibly removed from a voting station in Soweto for allegedly interfering in the work of the presiding officer there.

A heated exchange between Newzroom Afrika journalist Ziniko Mhlaba and the police played out live on air, with Mhlaba asking why he was being detained.

OPINION: SHENILLA MOHAMED: Yes, service delivery is about race and gender.
Almost three decades after Independence the ability to access quality service delivery - or any service delivery - in South Africa to a large extent still hinges on the colour of your skin and your gender. 


It said that there'd been a strong voter turn out at the more than 23,000 polling venues, with less than one percent of delays reported due to tents being blown over by strong winds overnight, the late arrival of election staff and voting material

The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) said that a presiding officer was arrested in eThekwini after allegedly stuffing marked ballots into a ballot box.
The commission, however, said that this had not affected Monday's voting process.

Mbeki said that many municipalities faced service delivery problems and many new councillors would have to face reality when they were voted in.

Former President Thabo Mbeki cast his vote in Houghton, saying that the country needed “honest people, not thieves”.
While media cameras and photographers followed him to his voting booth, a calm and relaxed Mbeki took his time to cast his ballot. 

 Umzinto community members took to the streets blocking the entrance to a local voting station - a police officer was injured. 
Minister Bheki Cele says law enforcement agencies have managed to calm the situation in some areas of concerns in the KwaZulu-Natal. 
He says voters around camperdown and umzinto can now vote safely
Cele says while residents have the right to air their grievances - disrupting the voting process will force officers to act. 

Police Minister Bheki Cele says voting stations which were under threat in KwaZulu-Natal - have now been opened and police are on site.  IEC officials yesterday abandoned their posts in Camperdown just outside Pietermaritzburg following threats of violence. 

There was a steady queue at Joubert Park, Gauteng's largest voting station, where voters said they did not want to check schedules to determine whether they would have basic services like water and electricity.

Rani Khumalo, a father of two, told Eyewitness News that all he wanted was reliable electricity and water supply. 

"It's getting worse. Before the end of the month, you're running out of electricity and even cold water," he said. 

 There was a steady queue at Joubert Park, Gauteng's largest voting station, where voters said they did not want to check schedules to determine whether they would have basic services like water and electricity. 

Voters in Despatch say they want greater investment in the dilapidated town. Political parties like the FF Plus, ANC and DA will be locking horns over the area which has seen little or no infrastructure investment in 20 years. 
 
After casting his vote in Kwazakhele, Mayor Nqaba Bhanga went to Despatch to cut the ribbon at the official opening of the towns first Debonairs Pizza store. 

Store manager and Despatch resident Eduan Meyer says the town has been neglected in terms of investment and he’ll be voting for change. 

Voters in KwaZakhele and suburbs like Summerstrand in Gqeberha braved the windy and cold weather to vote early and get on with their public holiday.

It seems some Eastern Cape residents are throwing themselves into voting with gusto.
Voting stations in KwaZakhele in Nelson Mandela Bay are hive of activity, with many voters arriving more than an hour early to cast their ballots. 

Certain of victory, the African National Congress (ANC)’s Sandiso Gcabayi said that for better service delivery, the party needed to walk this coming term alone.
The ANC parted ways with the Active United Front whose mayoral candidate, Punkie Mavis, said that coalitions only worked if parties were able to meet each other halfway.

Opposition parties vying for majority votes in the Bitou Municipality in the Southern Cape want outright wins this election, saying that coalition governments don’t work.
The town council has been plagued by political instability over the last several years.

Some Tshwane residents said that they were voting to push the Democratic Alliance (DA) out of government in the capital city. Residents of Mamelodi, east of Pretoria said that they had witnessed an increase in crime and the collapse of services since the 2016 local government elections. The DA has been governing the Tshwane metro through coalitions for the past five years. 

This is what resident, Vinodhan Naidoo, had to say: "The reason that I would like to see change, not only in our country but also where I live in Phoenix because as you know, a lot has been going on over the past few months in Phoenix."

After several days of violence in Phoenix in July, which claimed 36 lives, residents said that they would be voting for change in the community and they hope that their mark will make a difference.

These residents are among the first communities in the country who were the test subjects of coalition governance after political parties failed to clinch a majority in 2016. They say they have seen crime increase in townships such as Mamelodi where gangs battle for control of sections of the area.  The police have also launched a manhunt for a vigilante known as John Wick. 

Some Tshwane residents say they are voting today to push the DA out of government in the capital city. 
Residents of Mamelodi, East of Pretoria say they have witnessed an increase in crime and the collapse of services since the 2016 local government elections. 
The DA has been governing the Tshwane metro through coalitions for the past five years. 

 Former Springbok coach turned politician, Peter De Villiers has arrived at the Our Little People School In Paarl East, where he will be casting his vote. 

 The IEC said that anyone still in the queue at 9pm would not be turned away. Twenty-six million voters across the country are expected to cast their vote in the local government elections. 

After months of legal wrangling and worries about the COVID-19 pandemic, voting stations have opened across the country where millions of voters will be able to cast their ballots until 9pm.

 Geordin Hill-Lewis was encouraged by the snaking queue outside the building since before 7 am, even though the cool and rainy weather was less than ideal for queuing. 

 There is not a single protester in site here it seems the protest was started overnight. Public order policing arrived to clear the rubble and to monitor the situation. Residents have come out of their houses to see police restore calm. 

It’s unclear what the protest here is about but like make parts of Soweto electricity is the main concern. This disruption of the Chris Hani Baragwanath is strategic as this point connects parts of Soweto including Orlando- Pimville and Dlamini to what is known as deep Soweto.

The Chris Hani Baragwanath road in the Dlamini area is disrupted with tyres- and rubble used to barricade the road. Some traffic lights have been vandalized and knocked down.

Whilst the town is DA-run, this ward is an African National Congress (ANC) one but Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) ward councillor candidate, Luvuyo Ncamile, feels that the party has a good chance of snatching it from the ANC.

Queues are forming outside a polling station in Thembalethu, George as eager voters wait to cast their ballots on Monday morning.

 A reminder that all COVID-19 regulations apply at voting stations. 

Figures show there are at least 115,000 fewer citizens registered for this year's elections, compared to 2016.

 Millions of South Africans will head to the polls to make their mark in the 2021 local government elections. 

 Over 3000 voters are expected at the Bonwakgomo voting station in Chaneng — one of them is the North West ANC IPC provincial convener Suzan Dantjie. 

 It's mostly the elderly who have tried to beat the queues at the Bonwakgomo voting station in Chaneng, near Rustenburg. 

Twenty six million voters across the country are expected to cast their vote in the local government elections today. 

 Voters have already started arriving at some polling stations in the North West.  

The streets of Diepkloof are quiet today.

Mashaba was also out and about in different areas in Johannesburg.
He was trying all that he could to win the hearts of Christians at the Anglican cathedral in the CBD.

In Polokwane, Malema mobilised support in different areas including ward 13, known as Juju Valley, which the party won in the previous elections.

Leaders of political parties spent the weekend encouraging people to go out and vote for their parties on Monday.

In Joubert Park in Johannesburg, the largest voting district in Gauteng, there were four white marquee tents with blue and white IEC posters directing voters to the site.

The South African Weather Services sent out an advisory warning of cold, wet and windy conditions over the Western Cape but no matter the circumstances, voting stations opened at 7am sharp. 

Mamelodi has over 175 000 registered voters and is deemed one of the townships that will tip the vote in Gauteng – where political parties are hoping to make clean sweeps in Tshwane among other metros to avoid governing through coalitions. 

 Joubert Park is the largest voting station in Gauteng and officials are preparing for 13 000 people to come and cast their votes here. 


Security guards have arrived at other voting stations that Eyewitness News drove to – including Earlington Secondary School and Swanevale.


Gates to Eastview Primary School are opened – and officials are on-site preparing for the day.  



IEC officials are preparing for the long day ahead at voting stations.

In recent months Phoenix has been hit by violence which claimed 36 lives.

Remember to vote at the voting station where you’re registered between 7am to 9pm.

Johannesburg, eThekwini, eKurhuleni, Cape Town, Tshwane and Nelson Mandela Bay remain the most hotly contested municipalities in the country. It remains to be seen whether coalitions will become the order of the day.


The ANC received 53.91% of the votes, while the DA received 26.90% and the IFP 4.25%.


In the last local government elections, 58% of the registered voting population cast their ballots. With 2 or 3 ballots being given to each voter, depending on their municipality, 30,395,359 votes were cast in 2016.


Voter apathy has been plaguing the South African electoral system for years as frustrated and angry voters who have lost faith in government opt to not vote at all.


This past weekend saw millions of others cast their special votes and with less than the 1 million targeted special voters casting their ballots, it remains to be seen how many of the more than 26 million registered voters will turn out today.


The ConCourt ruling forced government and the IEC to quickly get the ball rolling, with a date period between the 27th October and 1st November given to have the elections – government chose today.


What was almost a day that was meant to happen only next year is finally here. The sixth democratic local government elections are here. Although an inquiry headed by retired Deputy Chief Justice Dikgang Moseneke concluded that elections during the COVID-19 pandemic would not be held in a free and fair manner, the Constitutional Court ruled that they had to be held.