Voices of Sharpeville

On 21 March 1960, 69 people were brutally murdered in Sharpeville and 180 were left wounded when the Apartheid Police opened fire on a peacefully gathered crowd that had arranged a protest against Pass Laws. In commemoration of the national tragedy we listen to the voices of the massacre’s survivors.

Abram Mofokeng

"They were moving around, the cops, picking them [demonstrators] up, shooting those who were badly injured…finishing them off.”

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Agnes Tsoai

“At the time I was 3 months pregnant. I couldn’t walk, I couldn’t talk, I tried to make my way home slowly. When I got home, all I could do was signal that I needed water.”

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Elizabeth Chabeli

"I was brought up by my grandparents. I got injured in that war, I was 11 years."

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Samuel Tshabalala

“That warfare brought us a lot of benefits. It set us free to be doing things we had always wanted to do, moving from one place to another without being asked where the dompas is.”

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Selena Mnguni

“I didn’t count how long we were at the hospital for to close the wounds. But before they were fully healed, a huge truck arrived outside...it was looking for people from Sharpeville.”

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