Solidarity to get involved in generation, selling of electricity in SA

The trade union on Thursday morning shared its research on Eskom's 15-year-long electricity struggles and presented plans on how the country's energy crisis can be remedied.

FILE: Solidarity points out the importance of fixing problems at Eskom as the country's future energy requirements run parallel with the utility's success. Picture: 123rf.com

CAPE TOWN - Solidarity will actively get involved in the generation and selling of electricity in the country.

The trade union on Thursday morning shared its research on Eskom's 15-year-long electricity struggles. The union has presented plans on how the country's energy crisis can be remedied.

The Solidarity Research Institute's report also provides a forecast of what South Africa could expect by 2035 in light of government’s energy plan.

The trade union has highlighted the crippling effect load shedding has on the economy. It also pointed out that job creation prospects in the country are bleak.

Solidarity has asked property investment company Canton, of which it is a majority shareholder, to apply for a power generation permit at the National Energy Regulator of South Africa.

Chief Executive Officer Dirk Hermann said as much power as possible should now be tapped into the grid.

“Solidarity itself is going to going to get itself in power generation. The South African labour market cannot survive the energy crisis. Our members’ jobs are being affected severely by load shedding and we cannot sit back any longer.”

Hermann points out the importance of fixing problems at Eskom as the country's future energy requirements run parallel with the utility's success.

“An energy landscape without Eskom is simply not realistic, and for this reason it is crucial to stabilise Eskom, so that it will be able to play an important part in the energy sector in South Africa.”

The trade union has encouraged small-scale power generation on a much larger scale and says government should allow the private sector to tap much more energy into the grid without having to deal with stifling red tape.