Petrol-saving hacks don't work: Tech specialist

Lester Kiewit spoke to a technical specialist and former technical editor for 'Car Magazine', Nicol Louw, about products that claim to help drivers save fuel.

With the petrol price jumping above R25 a litre, some consumers may find themselves tempted by wonder devices that claim to save petrol, but do any of these devices work?

Lester Kiewit spoke to a technical specialist and former technical editor for Car Magazine, Nicol Louw, about products that are believed to help drivers save fuel.

Targeted advertisements across social media seem to be flooded with pills and additives that promise to help drivers save huge amounts of fuel.

However, according to Louw, these apparent miracle devices absolutely do not work and the Western Cape Department of Transport has issued a warning about such as they can be dangerous.

A few years ago, Louw tested a number of fuel-saving devices in a controlled environment and the findings indicated that there were no benefits attached to saving fuel.

The reality is that modern internal combustion is so good at extracting the last bit of energy from the fuel, if you look at the combustion process itself 99%, even more, of the fuel's energy is actually released during that combustion event.

Nicol Louw, technical specialist and former technical editor for Car Magazine

Unfortunately, there are no quick fixes out there to stretch out the life of a petrol tank.

This means South Africans with a need to cut costs have to reduce their daily driving.

To find out more, listen to the full audio above.

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