All eyes now on law enforcement agencies to act on state capture report findings

Commission chairperson Raymond Zondo has been showered with praise for his handling of the judicial inquiry into state capture with his work heralded as meticulous by various quarters in society including business forums lobby groups labour and several political parties.

Chief Justice Raymond Zondo and President Cyril Ramaphosa stand as a backdrop to hard copies of the final parts of the State Capture report on Wednesday, 22 June 2022. Picture: GCIS

JOHANNESBURG - All eyes are now fixed on law enforcement agencies, including the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) to see what action they will take following the final release of the state capture report.

Commission chairperson Raymond Zondo has been showered with praise for his handling of the judicial inquiry into state capture, with his work heralded as meticulous by various quarters in society, including business forums, lobby groups, labour and several political parties.

READING LIST: Everything you need to know about the final state capture report

Corruption Watch said that it is now up to arms of state with investigative powers to pick up on his recommendations to ensure that justice was done and that the risk of state capture in the future was reduced.

It’s been four years in the making with almost R1 billion spent.

The judicial inquiry into state capture, chaired by Chief Justice Raymond Zondo, involved no less than 300 witnesses.

There were 3,171 summonses issued and 8,655,530 pages of documents used.

In the end, 1,438 people were implicated.

Corruption Watch's executive director Karam Singh said that the priority should now be to ensure that the country does not find itself in this position again.

"I think future-proofing the democracy against state capture really becomes the challenge now and should become the priority and focus of the government going forward," Singh said.

President Cyril Ramaphosa has indicated that he will present his response plan to Zondo’s findings to Parliament in four months’ time.

WATCH: [EXPLAINER] State capture: How did we get here?