Despite apartheid censorship, South Africa produced world class musicians

| Pippa Hudson speaks to live entertainer and public speaker dubbed the 'music guru' Sean Brokensha, on the history and impact of the South African music industry across the world.

Brokensha says during the 1980s South African music, much like the country at the time, was divided.

He adds that, there were primarily two camps, white music and black music.

The white music was recorded, had a larger budget and got a number of radio plays, but was often a watered down version of what was already being played overseas.

However, despite the intentional lack of recognition black musicians received in the country during apartheid, their music still made its way on to international airwaves.

He adds that Sophiatown in particular produced world-class musicians like Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Hugh Masekela, Mariam Makeba and Jonas Gwangwa.

Fast forward to the 90s, once South Africa got over its inferiority complex, black music skyrocketed, says Brokensha.

Black music, Sophiatown the melting pot I mean that produced world-class musicians we were unaware of because of Apartheid and because of censorship.

Sean Broekensha, Live entertainer and music guru

We had stuff happening but we couldn't actually take credit for it as a country influencing the world because we were a divided country and we were trying to repress what was good at the same time.

Sean Broekensha, Live entertainer and music guru

This article first appeared on CapeTalk : Despite apartheid censorship, South Africa produced world class musicians

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