Hundreds of Numsa-affiliated mineworkers gather at Impala mine for strike

Numsa claims contract workers are paid a fraction of what permanent employees earn and have accused the companies of refusing to acknowledge the union as a bargaining agent.

Hundreds of workers affiliated with Numsa gathered near shaft 8 of the Impala Platinum Mine in Freedom Park near Rustenburg on 21 June 2022 for a strike. Picture: Masechaba Sefularo/Eyewitness News

JOHANNESBURG - Hundreds of workers affiliated with metalworkers' union Numsa have gathered near shaft 8 of the Impala Platinum Mine in Freedom Park near Rustenburg on the second day of the indefinite strike over the alleged exploitation of workers at three companies contracted to supply services to the mine.

Numsa claims that contract workers are paid a fraction of what permanent employees earn and have accused the companies of refusing to acknowledge the union as a bargaining agent.

Meanwhile, union leaders are in court on Tuesday morning following an application to interdict the strike.

Hundreds of workers are gathered at the hill while more workers are still being bused in to join the strike.

The union’s Phakamile Hlubi-Majola said that they expected 4,000 workers to participate in the demonstration.

Hlubi-Majola said workers at Newrak, Reagetswe and Triple M Mining were paid far less than their counterparts for doing the same job.

"For example, a rock drill operator at Implants earns a minimum of R17,000 per month, and they earn benefits. The same RDO who works for one of these backward contractors will earn not more than R5,000 a month with no benefits," she said.

The union claims that it had submitted wage demands but the contractors refused to engage with them.

The union has also condemned the recent court action.

"Numsa condemns Reagetswe for attempting to undermine the right to strike with this frivolous court action," Hlubi-Majola said.

Workers will be addressed by a deployee from Numsa's national office, Enoch Manyoni.