TB detected in rhinos at Kruger National Park

| The strain of TB that has been seen in these rhinos is referred to as Bovine TB and can be seen in a variety of different animals in the park.

While we may all be aware of the effect that Tuberculosis (TB) has had on humans, everyone might not be aware that animals can also get TB, and this has been seen in rhinos in the Kruger National Park.

John Maytham spoke to leader of the Animal TB Research Group, Professor Michele Miller, about this.

The strain of TB that has been seen in these rhinos is referred to as Bovine TB and can be seen in a variety of different animals in the park.

According to Miller, this has been detected in about 15% of the park's rhino population and both black and white rhinos have been affected.

The first case of TB in a rhino was picked up in 2016, when the park was experiencing a drought, but it has likely been around for much longer.

We suspect that it may have been around here for quite a few years, but we just never found it because the animals are generally quite healthy, except in these climate extremes.

Michele Miller, leader of the Animal TB Research Group

In cases where the animals are healthy, they can carry the disease without it developing into an infection.

Listen to the audio for more.

This article first appeared on CapeTalk : TB detected in rhinos at Kruger National Park

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