Ramaphosa should appoint Maya as Chief Justice as soon as possible - analyst

Political analyst Susan Booysens said that the president now found himself in a no-win situation and would probably have to accept the Judicial Service Commission (JSC)'s recommendation that Judge Mandisa Maya was the most suitable for the job.

FILE: Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) President Judge Mandisa Maya during her interview with the Judicial Service Commission on 2 February 2022 for the position of Chief Justice. Picture: @OCJ_RSA/Twitter

CAPE TOWN - President Cyril Ramaphosa should appoint Judge Mandisa Maya as the next Chief Justice and he should do this at his earliest convenience.

That’s according to political analyst Susan Booysens, who said that Ramaphosa would probably have to accept the Judicial Service Commission (JSC)'s recommendation that Maya was the most suitable for the job.

Last week’s interviews for the Constitutional Court's top job have been slammed, with some calling the process into question.

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In an unprecedented move, the JSC made its recommendation to the president less than a day after conducting it's last interview.

Booysen said that the president now found himself in a no-win situation.

"It is almost a no-win situation for Ramaphosa. On the one hand, he has to and he chose to consult the JSC and they have given that opinion perhaps despite what is expected," Booysen said.

She said that he would have to go with the JSC’s recommendation and appoint Judge Maya.

"But Ramaphosa will probably have to find the points of credibility and just go with the current recommendation and hope that it does not backfire in terms of credibility," Booysen said.

The process has been lashed, with the Council for the Advancement of the South African Constitution (Casac) saying that it had been tainted by politics.