SA needs a new standalone anti-corruption body, says expert

There has been varied reaction to moves by the NPA to form a task force to deal with the findings of the state capture inquiry.

Chair of the state capture commission Raymond Zondo (L) handed over the first of the report to President Cyril Ramaphosa (R) on 4 January 2022. Picture: GCIS.

JOHANNESBURG - There has been varied reaction to moves by the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) to form a task force to deal with the findings of the state capture commission.

Following the release of part one of the report by the state capture commission, there has been mounting pressure to prosecute those cited in the report.

This included former South African Airways (SAA) chairperson Dudu Myeni and former South African Revenue Service commissioner Tom Moyane.

Director at Accountability Now Paul Hoffman said the NPA had been compromised.

“The NPA is so compromised that it would take many years to unscramble the egg that’s been so neatly scrambled from the day the Scorpions were closed down,” he said.

He said the NPA was poorly equipped and a new body was needed.

“I believe that what is required is a new standalone anti-corruption body that is constitutionally compliant in the sense that it is specialised, properly trained, independent of interference from crooks and the executive branch of government.”