Leave of appeal granted to Zuma a sign sanity has prevailed - foundation

Former President Jacob Zuma is fighting a High Court order for him to serve out the rest of his 15-month sentence, including the time he has been on medical parole.

Former President Jacob Zuma arrives at the state capture commission on 19 July 2019. Picture: Abigail Javier/EWN

JOHANNESBURG - The Jacob Zuma Foundation said that the High Court granting him leave to appeal an order sending back to prison was a sign that sanity has prevailed.

Zuma is fighting a High Court order for him to serve out the rest of his 15-month sentence, including the time that he has been on medical parole.

Both his and former Correctional Services Commissioner Arthur Fraser's legal representatives have argued that Judge Elias Matojane erred when handing down judgment.

The judge said that the case raised an important question of public law with regards to the interpretation for the Correctional Services Act and its regulations.

Matojane also said that it was possible for another court to show Zuma compassion and empathy or to even rule that his order instructing the former leader to also serve the time he has spent on parole was unfair.

The Jacob Zuma Foundation has celebrated its patron’s High Court win on Tuesday.

It insisted that the judgment stood no chance in the Supreme Court of Appeal.

Spokesperson Mzwanele Manyi insisted that the judge misdirected himself: “It’s almost like they did not understand that a medical parole is parole as we had to read out to him the technical definitions.”

Manyi said Matojane red-carded the former leader for allowing a prayer meeting in his honour and had handed down a sentence that undermined Zuma’s legal rights.

“That was actually, by default, extending the sentence of President Zuma without trial again,” Manyi said.

Matojane also ruled that the cost orders linked to the matter be argued in the Supreme Court of Appeal when the matter was heard.

WATCH: ‘He needs compassion and empathy at his age’ - Jacob Zuma granted leave to appeal