Ahmed Kathrada Foundation warns corruption eating away at public trust in govt

The Kathrada Foundation’s Balton said that the July unrest was a reflection of the public’s growing distrust in government and the state’s weakened ability to protect its people.

The Zondo commission of Inquiry into state capture. Picture: EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - Ahmed Kathrada Foundation director Neeshan Balton said that state capture had continued and that it was eating away at the public’s trust in government.

Balton was speaking at a virtual event commemorating International Anti-corruption Day, which was hosted by the Public Service Commission in partnership with the United Nations and Unisa.

Balton has warned that citizens may begin to withdraw from the democratic project as a result of corruption.

The Kathrada Foundation’s Balton said that the July unrest was a reflection of the public’s growing distrust in government and the state’s weakened ability to protect its people.

"When capture and corruption erode state intelligence to policing and everything else, it renders the state to be incapable of doing the basics - gathering intelligence, protecting its people," Balton said.

He said that corruption also forced people to fight among themselves for the scarce resources.

"As people have to scrabble for the few crumbs that are there, we then start othering each other and now it's a conflict between South Africans and what is deemed foreign nationals," he said.

Balton has called on the public show less tolerance for corruption.