NPA wants a commission of inquiry into unresolved cases from the TRC

The NPA has been dealing with several cases linked to apartheid crimes, such as that of the Cradock Four.

FILE: Then Archbishop Desmond Tutu (centre) with fellow commissioners listen to testimony from witnesses during the start of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission which opened in East London, 15 April 1996. Picture: AFP.

JOHANNESBURG - The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) said it had created a centralised model to deal with cases from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

The NPA has been dealing with several cases linked to apartheid crimes, such as that of the Cradock Four: Matthew Goniwe, Fort Calata, Sparrow Mkhonto and Sicelo Mhlauli.

It now wants a commission of inquiry to investigate the shortcomings of the TRC.

Many apartheid killers were granted amnesty by the commission.

“There was a residual of matters, where amnesty was not granted or where perpetrators did not come forward and apply for amnesty and these are the cases we are dealing with,” said Deputy National Director of Public Prosecutions Advocate Rodney de Kock.

Last week, the NPA missed its deadline on deciding to prosecute certain former apartheid police officers for the murders of the Cradock Four. The men were kidnapped, tortured and killed on 27 June 1985.

De Kock explained why: “We are not able to meet that simply because the prosecutors are still indicating that there are still aspects of this investigation that need to be done.”

The NPA's next deadline to address the Cradock Four matter is 13 December, thereafter the Fort Calata Foundation, led by Calata’s son Lukhanyo, has threatened to pursue litigation.