Fedusa endorses mandatory vaccinations, but says complexities must be probed

Fedusa believed the outcomes of these investigations and consultations should strike a balance between public health concerns, constitutional provisions, cultural and religious beliefs and economic recovery.

FILE: The congress concluded on the East Rand of Johannesburg on Monday. Picture: fedusa.org.za

CAPE TOWN - Some of the topics of discussion on the agenda of labour federation Fedusa's congress included climate change, increasing local procurement of goods and services and the COVID-19 pandemic.

The congress concluded on the East Rand of Johannesburg on Monday.

In addition to adopting a set of new strategic resolutions, Fedusa also elected a new leadership collective.
Fedusa said a package of new strategic resolutions adopted by the special congress would take the federation forward over the coming years.

These resolutions include the Climate Change Policy, with the labour federation stressing urgent action is needed as the ecological crisis continues to deepen, presenting fears and uncertainties for current and future generations.

Fedusa has also reiterated its stance on mandatory vaccinations.

It fully endorses government's plans to investigate making COVID-19 vaccinations mandatory, but said the social partners of organised labour, business and government at Nedlac should be given the opportunity to investigate the complexities of this move.

It added this should be in addition to investigating the feasibility of restricting access of unvaccinated individuals to shared spaces and public facilities such as workplaces, public transport, restaurants, grocery stores and places of worship.

Fedusa believed the outcomes of these investigations and consultations should strike a balance between public health concerns, constitutional provisions, cultural and religious beliefs and economic recovery.

It said an important area of focus for organised labour would be whether both the Occupational Health and Safety Act and the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act should be amended to include COVID-19 as an occupational disease that triggers fair compensation for affected workers.