July unrest: SAHRC says findings are binding

Proceedings in KwaZulu-Natal have wrapped up following testimony from affected families, politicians, and experts.

The South African Human Rights Commission hears evidence on the July riots at the Durban International Convention Centre on 16 November 2021. Picture: @SAHRCommission/Twitter

JOHANNESBURG - The South African Human Rights Commission said it was pleased with the hearings into the July civil unrest, which saw a number of witnesses testify.

Proceedings in KwaZulu-Natal have wrapped up following testimony from affected families, politicians, and experts.

The process is for inquisitorial purposes - to determine if there was violation of human right.

More than 300 lives were lost in Gauteng during the widespread looting that caused a devastating ripple effect on the country's economy.

Advocate Tseliso Thipanyane, the commission's chief executive officer, said the hearings would continue next year.

"We have opened the extension for further submissions which the public can make. Our findings as far as we are concerned are binding therefore they can only be reviewed by a court of law but we also expect the state to refer to our recommendations," Thipanyane said.