Court granting access to Zuma tax records has implications for Sars - JZF

The High Court in Pretoria ruled that investigative journalism unit amaBhungane and business magazine, Financial Mail, must be allowed access to former President Jacob Zuma's tax history for the years between 2010 and 2018.

FILE: Former President Jacob Zuma at the state capture inquiry in Johannesburg on 17 November 2020. Picture: Abigail Javier/Eyewitness News.

JOHANNESBURG - The Jacob Zuma Foundation is not happy with this week's court ruling granting two media houses access to the former president's tax records.

The High Court in Pretoria ruled that investigative journalism unit amaBhungane and business magazine, Financial Mail, must be allowed access to Zuma's tax history for the years between 2010 and 2018.

The media houses lodged an application to access the records in November 2019.

However, the Jacob Zuma Foundation's Mzwanele Manyi has called on the South African Revenue Service (Sars) to appeal the judgment.

"This has implications even for Sars. In their own submission, Sars has made it clear that the issue of Sars being trusted not to give away information had been central in the collection of taxes from people. Now that confidence has been shattered by this court ruling," Manyi said.

Manyi said that they were also weighing their options.