Fort Calata Foundation: De Klerk died without accounting for apartheid crimes

The Fort Calata Foundation said that former apartheid-era President FW De Klerk should have faced the families of those who were tortured and killed during apartheid.

FILE: Frederik Willem de Klerk (FW de Klerk), the former president who shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Mandela in 1993, answers questions about his memories of Nelson Mandela, on 11 July 2017, in his office in Cape Town. De Klerk was the South African president who ordered Mandela's release from prison. Picture: AFP

JOHANNESBURG - The Fort Calata Foundation said that former apartheid-era President FW De Klerk should have faced the families of those who were tortured and killed during apartheid.

The foundation's Lukhanyo Calata said that another apartheid criminal had died without having accounted for the crimes that he helped perpetrate against humanity.

The four anti-apartheid activists, Matthew Goniwe, Sparrow Mkonto, Fort Calata and Sicelo Mhlauli - known as the Cradock Four - were killed by the apartheid government on 27 June 1985.

Calata said that De Klerk's death had robbed the four families of the opportunity to discover the truth about the murders of their loved ones, including his own father.

"We will never know what De Klerk said when they were discussing the military signal for the permanent removal of the Cradock Four and this is why we say he has taken that secret with him to the grave."

Calata has called on the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) to expedite the prosecution of cases brought forward during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

"They are other suspects that remain alive today, someone like Adriaan Vlok is alive - he could still be prosecuted, Joffel van der Westhuizen, Barend Du Plessis so we can't be sitting here next week, next month, next year saying 'ooh, yet another one has died' when the NPA has that time and the resources to charge them and prosecute them today."

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