South Africa lost a father who served it with honour: Mandela says of De Klerk

Mandla Mandela said he had personally witnessed the great relationship of dignified respect Madiba accorded him and has requested South Africa do the same.

Former president Nelson Mandela’s eldest grandson, Mandla Mandela. Picture: Abigail Javier/Eyewitness News

JOHANNESBURG - Nelson Mandela’s grandson Chief Mandla Mandela has described South Africa's last apartheid president FW de Klerk's as a pillar of strength to his family.

FW de Klerk died at the age of 85 on Thursday after a battle with cancer.

READ:
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In a statement released on Friday, Mandla said the nation has lost a father who served the country with distinction.

Mandla said many may not agree with his views about De Klerk, but he had personally witnessed the great relationship of dignified respect Madiba accorded him and has requested South Africa do no less.

Meanwhile, political party Al Jama-ah has accepted De Klerk's acknowledgement of the pain and indignity caused by apartheid.

His foundation released a pre-recorded video where De Klerk apologises for injustices suffered by black, Indian and coloured South Africans.

Party leader Ganief Hendricks said corporations which benefitted from the regime as well as Afrikaners must now do the same, by paying reparations.

“They must clear South Africa’s debt. That will be a good start to show good faith that they really mean what they say. This is a preliminary requirement which must be funded by the wealth accumulated over the generations due to the crimes committed against the oppressed people of South Africa.”

WATCH: In his final words, De Klerk still didn't call apartheid a crime against humanity