Service delivery is a right, not a privilege, says Amnesty International SA

According to Amnesty International, almost 20 million people in South Africa do not have access to safe, reliable water and 14 million people do not have access to basic sanitation.

FILE: A child crosses a water stream that is flowing through a damaged road in Meqheleng, in Ficksburg, in the Free State. It's been 10 years since Andries Tatane died in protest for better service delivery. Picture: Boikhutso Ntsoko/Eyewitness News

JOHANNESBURG - People living in communities without running water, sanitation and housing are calling on politicians to actually deliver on their promises of service delivery.

Amnesty International visited several communities, where they spoke to residents ahead of the local government elections in three weeks’ time.

The global movement, which has a presence in 150 countries, has canvassed voters on the burning issues and human rights violations in their communities.

Amnesty International South Africa's executive director, Shenilla Mohamed, has highlighted that service delivery was a right and not a privilege.

She said that in recent times, the quality of service delivery had largely been weakened by corruption at the expense of people living in the country who are constitutionally entitled to have their basic needs met and to live with dignity.

According to Amnesty International, almost 20 million people in South Africa do not have access to safe, reliable water and 14 million people do not have access to basic sanitation.

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