Neasa: It's time for Cosatu to realise that they've lost their influence

The National Employers Association of South Africa (Neasa) said that more than 83% of staff reported for duty, ignoring a plea by the federation to stay home and withdraw their labour during its national strike on Thursday.

FILE: Striking Cosatu members in Pretoria on 7 October 2020. Picture: Abigail Javier/Eyewitness News.

JOHANNESBURG - The National Employers Association of South Africa (Neasa) has criticised cosatu, saying that its ability to impact the national discourse, had vanished entirely.

The association said that more than 83% of staff reported for duty, ignoring a plea by the federation to stay home and withdraw their labour during its national strike on Thursday.

The association conducted a survey with 191 firms to determine whether the Cosatu protest had any effect on business.

Despite the shortage on throngs of supporters, the federation said that its message to the public and private sector was well received.

The one-day strike was aimed at, among other issues, putting pressure on government and the private sector to address corruption, unemployment and retrenchments.

Cosatu’s Gauteng chairperson, Amos Monyela, called on the government to fix embattled state-owned entities, put a hold on retrenching workers and commitment to creating new jobs.

However, Neasa CEO Gerhard Papenfus said that the call by South Africa’s biggest labour group for workers to stay home went largely unheeded.

"The Cosatu protest action was a complete failure. There were a few companies that were affected in Gauteng, there were a few companies that were affected in the Westen Cape and I think it's time for Cosatu to realise that they've lost their influence."

Meanwhile, a separate strike by trade union Numsa continued into a third day, with workers staying home in several provinces.

WATCH: Cosatu in Gauteng demands more respect for collective bargaining

Download the Eyewitness News app to your iOS or Android device.