City Power distances itself from the death of a protestor in Alex

On Tuesday, the utility disconnected illegal power connections in areas in and around Alexandra - including River Park and structures built around London Road.

JMPD officers and City Power officials conducted an illegal electricity connection operation in Alexandra on 21 September 2021. All exit streets were then closed off by protesting residents with burning tyres and big stones. Picture: JMPD.

JOHANNESBURG - City Power has distanced itself from the death of a protestor in Alexandra and said it was in no way liable.

On Tuesday, the utility disconnected illegal power connections in areas in and around Alexandra - including River Park and structures built around London Road.

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A group of protesters blocked the road with burning tyres and allegedly tried to force entry into the nearby Alexandra Mall.

A security guard is accused of opening fire, fatally wounding one community member.

He is expected to appear in court on Wednesday morning in connection with the deadly shooting
City Power's Isaac Mangena on Wednesday said they couldn’t be blamed for the shooting.

“The death of a protestor happened long after City Power left, and it has got nothing to do with City Power. Even when it happened, City Power and JMPD had long left Alexandra.”

The power utility said its only motivation for removing illegal connections in Alexandra was to protect people from being electrocuted by dangerous DIY jobs.

Mangena said were called to dismantle illegal connections by Alex families worried by safety.

“You’ve got formalised houses, who are the ones who invited us because of the challenges that they face every day of outages caused by overloading of the network due to these illegal connections. We also have those caring mothers and fathers whose children have been electrocuted by these illegal connections in Alexandra.”

On Monday, the president used his weekly newsletter to acknowledge what voters have told him that municipalities are slow to attend to their problems and that government officials are missing in action.

He said citizens often complained that in the lead up to elections, ward councillors, candidates and officials were energetic, interacting with communities and listening to their concerns.

However, once elections have passed, they either disappear or it becomes difficult to reach them.

He used the electricity crisis as a case in point describing it as the most crucial issue for South African communities.

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