Unacceptable that families of Marikana victims still seeking justice - AISA

Executive director of Amnesty International South Africa, Shenilla Mohamed, said that the widows of Marikana and the public in general needed closure in the form of accountability from government.

FILE: The Marikana community gathered to commemorate the massacre on 16 August 2019 which saw 34 miners gunned down on 16 August 2012. Picture: Kayleen Morgan/Eyewitness News

JOHANNESBURG - Amnesty International South Africa said that it was unacceptable that no form of redress had been instituted by government over the Marikana massacre.

It's been nine years since the worst tragedy in the country's democracy, in which 34 mineworkers died and 78 others were injured at the hands of the South African Police Service while protesting for better wages.

It remains the most violent mass killing in post-apartheid South Africa by police and yet close to a decade later, not a single arrest has been made while many recommendations by the Farlam commission of inquiry have not been implemented.

Executive director, Shenilla Mohamed, said that the widows of Marikana and the public in general needed closure in the form of accountability from government.

“It will be nine years since police used live ammunition on striking mineworkers at Lonmin Platinum Mine in Marikana. It is unacceptable that almost a decade later, the families of the victims are still seeking justice. The state must ensure that those who are responsible must be prosecuted and the families of the victims must get the justice they deserve,” she said.

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