Remembering Marikana: 9 years later and no one held accountable for murders

The country will commemorate a defining moment in its history and young democracy in which mineworkers who embarked on a three-week strike for better wages were gunned down in the North West.

Marikana miners wait for religious leaders to address them. Picture: Andrea van Wyk/EWN.

JOHANNESBURG - On Monday marks nine years since the Marikana massacre where 34 miners died, and 78 others were injured at the hands of the South African police.

The country will commemorate a defining moment in its history and young democracy in which mineworkers who embarked on a three-week strike for better wages were gunned down in the North West.

Amnesty International South Africa has raised concerns that, close to a decade later, not a single police officer has been charged for the murders while affected families have seen little change to their economic conditions.

Executive director Shenilla Mohamed said the lack of accountability for the massacre was disheartening: “The Farlam Commission investigating the killings made a number of recommendations most of which are yet to be implemented and no one has been held to account. We cannot allow the senseless killings to be forgotten.”

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