Ramaphosa: ANC officials disagreed with Zuma in axing Gordhan as finmin

Ramaphosa was on Thursday testifying for his last day before Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo at the state capture commission of inquiry.

President Cyril Ramaphosa appears at the state capture inquiry on 12 August 2021. Picture: GCIS

JOHANNESBURG - President Cyril Ramaphosa has described the 2017 axing of once Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan as a moment of great alarm, confirming that African National Congress (ANC) officials disagreed with former President Jacob Zuma on the decision.

Ramaphosa was on Thursday testifying for his last day before Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo at the state capture commission of inquiry.

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He said ANC top officials did not believe that the fake intelligence report used as a basis, which Ramaphosa describes as flimsy to fire Gordhan and his deputy Mcebisi Jonas.

The report was also used by Zuma to recall the finance minister and his team from an investor’s roadshow abroad.

Ramaphosa said he informed Zuma during a meeting that he would make his views publicly known: “And I did say, ‘we are going to be asked about this and when we are asked about this, we will have to speak out’ and he said he knew that we would be asked to speak out and I made a point to say I will be speaking out.”

WATCH: Fighting state capture & taking responsibility – Ramaphosa concludes testimony

‘SOMETHING WRONG HAPPENED IN OUR COUNTRY’

Ramaphosa said he had to testify before the state capture commission because something in the country had gone very wrong.

The president has accounted for his own actions during the height of the state capture period, saying it wasn’t easy deciding to testify.

The end of Ramaphosa’s testimony signals the last public hearing relating to witnesses at the state capture commission.

In between, what many have called his bromance with \ Zondo and fielding tough questions about why state capture continued unabated, Ramaphosa said it was difficult but important for him to participate.

“Something really wrong happened in our country and to put it right, I’ve got to go.”

The president, while lauding the work of the commission, also praised the country for showing that despite the damage caused by state capture, its democracy remains robust and resilient.

“To acknowledge that we would not have reached this point, this commission would not be sitting now had it not been the determined actions of South Africans.”

The commission will now begin the work of putting together the different pieces of the puzzle to reveal a picture of what’s really taken place in the country.

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