'Take over that thing': EFF KZN members told to disrupt Zikalala’s appearances

The party has taken issue with Zikalala after he was seen physically assaulting an alleged looter during an oversight visit last month.

EFF secretary general Marshall Dlamini addresses fighters in Phoenix on 5August 2021. Picture: Nkosikhona Duma/Eyewitness News

DURBAN - The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) has on Thursday called on its members to disrupt KwaZulu-Natal Premier Sihle Zikalala’s public appearances, referring to him as an enemy of black people.

The party has taken issue with Zikalala after he was seen physically assaulting an alleged looter during an oversight visit last month.

The EFF’s secretary general and MP Marshall Dlamini addressed scores of members during an anti-racism march to the Phoenix police station on Thursday.

Thirty-six people were killed in the area during the unrest last month, while a number of arrests have been made.

Zikalala apologised after he was seen attacking a young man outside a looted retail outlet in Durban last month, but Dlamini said the incident was not forgivable.

“Fighters, Sihle Zikalala must never address any meetings in this province. If you hear that he has a public conference, take over that thing.”

In an energised address, Dlamini also called on members to disobey law enforcement officials where they felt necessary.

“If every time the EFF is in confrontation with racists, they take the sides of the racist, we are going to make them our enemies.”

The EFF’s presence in Phoenix on Thursday was characterised by a strong police presence.

Some residents said they were unsettled by the racialised tone of the demonstrations but no security issues have so been reported.

WATCH: ‘We can’t tolerate this nonsense of racism’: EFF marches in Phoenix

TAKE A STAND

EFF supporters have handed over a memorandum to the Phoenix police station demanding that the government make sure that those responsible for killings in the area are prosecuted.

However, some residents say while some racial tensions persisted in their community, they were often exaggerated, and many condemned the killings.

“Phoenix has gotten a really bad image, and it wasn’t like this previously because the Indians and the Blacks lived together and we want to take a stance and want the majority of Indian people in Phoenix to not remain silent and create a legacy for your grandchildren and children’s children,” one resident said.

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