CoCT residents urged to consider alternative ways to lay loved ones to rest

To deal with the province's COVID-19 third wave and limit the spread of the virus, the City's Zahid Badroodien said residents should think of burying relatives during the week instead of over weekends.

Two men fill in a grave after the funeral of a man who died of COVID-19 coronavirus for a Muslim burial at the Klip Road Cemetery in Grassy Park, Cape Town, on 9 June 2020. Picture: AFP

CAPE TOWN – With an increase in burials in Cape Town, the municipality has urged the public to consider alternative ways of laying loved ones to rest.

The City of Cape Town has debunked reports suggesting the province's graveyards were fast running out of capacity as COVID-19 related deaths remain high.

About 500 burials had been recorded in the metro over the past week.

To deal with the province's COVID-19 third wave and limit the spread of the virus, the City's Zahid Badroodien said residents should think of burying relatives during the week instead of over weekends.

"We've been working very close to undertaker forums as well as religious institutions to engage with residents around alternative types but also being open to burying their loved ones during the week in order to reduce the number of people who are at our facilities."

Ten thousand COVID-19 related deaths have been recorded in the Cape Town metro since the start of the pandemic.
Badroodien said facilities are able to cope with the increased demand, as the current tallies were nowhere close to what was seen during the second wave's peak earlier this year.

"I want to further appeal to our residents to continue to be open-minded towards alternative forms of burials such as cremation and making use of the mausoleum space at the Maitland cemetery."

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