Lobby groups march against Firearms Control Amendment Bill in Cape Town today

The SA Gunowners' Association's Damian Enslin said the implications of having this Bill passed are far-reaching and that the economy will suffer a major blow.

Protest organisers outside Parliament in Cape Town on Saturday 19 June 2021 say the draft Firearm Control Bill is unconstitutional, and it removes the right of citizens to protect themselves. Picture: Eyewitness News/Lizell Persens

CAPE TOWN – Lobby groups rallying against the controversial Firearms Control Amendment Bill marched to Parliament on Saturday.

Last month, the Civilan Secretariat for Police Service called for public comment on the Bill that seeks to remove self-defence as a reason to own a firearm.

Demonstrators said the draft Bill would overstep the constitutional and humanitarian rights of citizens to defend themselves.

Dozens of protesters took to Plein Street on Saturday afternoon to make their voices heard.

Scores of disgruntled protesters, mainly bikers, in favour of owning a gun to protect themselves took to the streets of Cape Town.

Many were clad in black, donning biker jackets and placards.

The United Independent Movement's Neil De Beer said – considering the country's escalating crime rate – it is ‘essential’ that residents have the option of owning a gun.

“We are not in a country that feels safe. It’s not an attack on race today; it is an attack on black and white’s right to defend our families.”

READ: SA organisations gear up to fight proposed Firearms Control Amendment Bill

The SA Gunowners' Association's Damian Enslin said the implications of having this Bill passed are far-reaching and that the economy will suffer a major blow.

“My right to choose to own a firearm for sporting purposes is less and reduced, that whole industry will be down and done. Hunting is one of the biggest industries in South Africa as well. Hunting produces hundreds of millions of rand. If you just look at the micro-level, if they reduce the number of hunting firearms those villages; the trackers, the people that work on the meat; all that industry gets affected.”

The City of Cape Town's JP Smith accepted their memorandum of demands.

“However grim the crime situation is now, it is going to get bleaker and it is against that background that you can’t tell people you can’t defend yourself.”

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