Dodgy connections, theft & vandalism are making load shedding worse - Eskom

Gauteng and the Western Cape are most affected by damage to infrastructure and illegal connections which put a lot of pressure on the power grid.

FILE: City Power officials on 3 June 2020 disconnected illegal electricity connections at Phumula Mqashi informal settlement in Vlakfontein. The officials were joined by JMPD and SAPS officers. Picture: @CityPowerJhb/Twitter.

JOHANNESBURG - With the country undergoing load shedding, Eskom said recent illegal connections, cable theft and vandalism has prolonged outages as it adds pressure onto the system.

The power utility is currently implementing stage two load shedding which is expected to continue for the rest of the weekend.

Gauteng and the Western Cape are most affected by damage to infrastructure and illegal connections which put a lot of pressure on the power grid.

“The impact of these illegal connections is multi-pronged; firstly, it damages the equipment on the network which is unsustainable for us to keep replacing. It affects legally-paying customers in that, when we have a fault we’re unable to restore electricity, said Eskom General Manager in the Western Cape and Eastern Cape Alwie Lester.

“We have tried going in certain areas, disconnecting, but we constantly facing challenges in that we are being prohibited from coming into areas to disconnect.”

The utility called on members of the public to report any suspicious activity relating to vandalism and theft of electrical infrastructure to police.

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