I’d like to enable probe into Mkhize to proceed - Ramaphosa

He has denied he is “outsourcing” his morality to law enforcement agencies by insisting that investigations into the Digital Vibes scandal first unfold before he takes any action.

President Cyril Ramaphosa at a media briefing on 3 June 2021. Picture: GCIS

CAPE TOWN - President Cyril Ramaphosa said the scandal embroiling his Health Minister Zweli Mkhize would not be swept under the carpet.

He has denied he is “outsourcing” his morality to law enforcement agencies by insisting that investigations into the Digital Vibes scandal first unfold before he takes any action.

Mkhize is under scrutiny over an irregular R150 million Department of Health contract being probed by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) and other allegations, involving two of his close associates.

Ramaphosa was fielding questions from reporters after replying to debate on the Presidency budget vote at Parliament on Thursday afternoon.

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He said he wanted to get to the truth of allegations involving Mkhize.

“This matter is on my desk. This matter is not going to be swept under the carpet. This matter is going to be dealt with. And as it is now, I am dealing with the matter. And what is good, as I said yesterday, is that the minister is cooperating. He is cooperating fully.

"A number of things keep surfacing, they’re surfacing about his son and monies that have been paid and I’d like to enable the investigation to proceed.”

Ramaphosa acknowledged impatience over the matter but said he wanted to be careful and wait for the full process to unfold.

“I’ve not outsourced morality to the law enforcement agencies the do their work, they execute the work that needs to be done.”

WATCH: President Ramaphosa: ‘Corruption is not a victimless crime’

PLANS IN PLACE TO REFORM ESKOM

The president also addressed the issue of intermittent load shedding, saying plans were moving swiftly to reform Eskom and ensure it ran more efficiently.

But he wouldn't commit to a date when load shedding would be a thing of the past.

“It’s obviously a challenge when you are dealing with machines that break, machines that have not been well-maintained in the past. It is a big challenge but as we proceed to get more alternative power and lighten the burden on Eskom, we will be able to get on top of the challenges.”

The parastatal is calling on everyone in the country to use less electricity when it is available to help ease constraints on its fragile power system.

South Africans have had to put up with costly, frustrating and inconvenient power cuts in the middle of a cold front this week.

The current bout of stage two blackouts is expected to last until 10 pm on Friday.

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