Calls for strong action and accountability after violence during PAP session

The ANC Women’s League was among the many voices calling for the Pan-African Parliament to take action against anyone guilty of gender-based violence.

Members of the Pan-African Parliament clashed in the House in Midrand on 31 May 2021. Picture: YouTube screengrab.

JOHANNESBURG - There are calls for strong action and accountability after the Pan-African Parliament sitting in Midrand ended in physical violence, walkouts, shouting and desperate calls for the police to intervene.

On Monday, African National Congress (ANC) Chief Whip Pemmy Majodina was kicked by fellow member Djibril War from Senegal while trying to break up a fight that broke out amid attempts by some to delay the election of a new president.

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The ANC Women’s League was among the many voices calling for the Pan-African Parliament to take action against anyone guilty of gender-based violence.

Last week, EFF leader Julius Malema threatened to kill another member from Mali, in full view of the cameras during a sitting.

At the time, ANC chief whip and member of the Parliament, Pemmy Majodina, told the media that the scene between Malema and the Mali delegate was blown out of proportion.

But then on Monday, as the delegates were supposed to elect a new president, a scuffle broke out and Majodina was kicked, again in view of the rolling cameras.

The ANC Women’s League said it was appalled by what it called this "un-African" action and it was calling on Majodina to open a criminal case at the police station.

Political analysts said that there was an urgent need for the Pan-African Parliament to transform to address the deep-seated problems that have led to violent scuffles between members, a death threat and a woman being kicked in full view of rolling cameras.

Analysts warned that some of the Pan-African Parliament members were divided due to their differences on cultural and generational level.

Babatunde Fagbayibo is a professor of international law at Unisa and he said that pan-Africanism was still alive, but he admitted that it had to do better when it came to forging unity on the African continent amid many disagreements.

"There will be contestation. You cannot delegate a national parliamentarian to the Pan-African Parliament."

Meanwhile, Good Governance Africa's Chris Moreleng said that the Pan-African Parliament must focus on tightening its mandate and transformation.

"If we continue to prevaricate between continually fighting around leadership and ultimately not focusing on providing effective, decision-making support."

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