Montana stands by decision to approve Prodigy training programme

Former Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) Group CEO, Lucky Montana, confirms that Prodigy Business Services increased the number of people trained by the rail agency from 300 to 3,000 but said that there was nothing illegal about the increase.

A screengrab of former Prasa CEO Lucky Montana appearing at the state capture inquiry on 16 April 2021. Picture: SABC/YouTube

JOHANNESBURG - Former Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) Group CEO, Lucky Montana, confirms that Prodigy Business Services increased the number of people trained by the rail agency from 300 to 3,000 but said that there was nothing illegal about the increase.

Instead, he said that it changed lives and gave hope to people who were temporarily employed and kept in the same positions for years.

He is back at the state capture commission to testify about the rail agency.

Prasa allegedly did not open the tender for competitive bidding.

Initially, the agreed training was expected to cost R18 million that would be claimed from the Transport Seta but Prodigy was paid R82 million between 2011 and 2016.

However, Montana stood by the decision: "I think the training material that I provide will prove that the higher you go, the more complex the problem became. The GM approved certain things, chair, but the overall programme was endorsed by me as the group chief executive and I'm confirming that to you, chair."

Prodigy has been reported to have made a payment of R4.5 million to controversial Durban businessman, Roy Moodley, who in turn allegedly paid former President Jacob Zuma R1 million a month for four months in 2009.

But Montana denies any knowledge that Zuma influenced any Prasa decisions.

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