Taxi industry conflict exacerbated by law officials who own taxis, inquiry says

Gauteng Roads and Transport MEC Jacob Mamabolo has released the findings into the underlying recurring violence and fatalities in the taxi industry.

Picture: Xanderleigh Dookey/Eyewitness News

JOHANNESBURG - The commission of inquiry into taxi violence in Gauteng has lifted the lid on how some law enforcement officials have business interests in the taxi industry, which has been one of the major contributors to the conflict in the sector.

Gauteng Roads and Transport MEC Jacob Mamabolo has released the findings into the underlying recurring violence and fatalities in the taxi industry.

The commission said it's investigating more than 500 cases of taxi violence which were unresolved.

The role of law enforcement officers in taxi violence has been highlighted as one of the key components by the commission.

Commissioner Hlula Msimang said some officers had been implicated in having financial interests in the sector.

“Some law enforcement officials are involved in being operators of taxis which is against the law.”

Mamabolo acknowledged this had contributed to law enforcement agencies being noneffective in dealing with cases of taxi violence.

“It is a commonly held view that law enforcement is highly conflicted, which explains why it is ineffective in dealing with taxi-related crime.”

The commission said one of the reasons why there were so many illegal taxi operators in the province was because many drivers got away with bribing police officers and thus creating saturation in a particular route, resulting in taxi violence.

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