No scientific evidence to prove 5G mutates coronavirus, scientists reiterate

The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research has on Monday held a briefing to unpack the technology as well as address concerns around whether 5G presents a health risk.

FILE: This undated handout image obtained August 11, 2020, courtesy of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIH/NIAID), shows a transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, isolated from a patient, captured and colour-enhanced at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility in Fort Detrick, Maryland. Picture:  National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/AFP.

CAPE TOWN - Scientists have yet again debunked the myth that 5G technology mutates the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

On 7 January 2020, ‘Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2’ (SARS-CoV-2) was confirmed as the causative agent of ‘Coronavirus Disease 2019’ or COVID-19.

The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research has on Monday held a briefing to unpack the technology as well as address concerns around whether 5G presents a health risk.

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There have been several conspiracy theories linked to the high-speed connectivity tech, including an association with cancer, effects on the skin and the spreading of COVID-19.

Senior researcher at Next Generation Health Essa Suleman said all conspiracy theories related to COVID-19 and 5G are false.

“Many of these health hazards are unfounded based on science that can’t be replicated, misinformation and fake news.”

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He said 5G has already been rolled out in several countries, and many regions without the technology have had significant COVID-19 infection rates.

“Look at the WHO coronavirus dashboard, many parts of the world where there are no 5G rollouts still had significant numbers of COVID-19.”

Scientists have also rubbished the conspiracy theory that governments would use COVID-19 vaccines to spy on citizens.

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