Online scuffles: ANC factional battles play out publicly amid Zuma-Zondo saga

While Zuma’s close ally, ANC secretary general Ace Magashule, has called for the former president to be left alone, the party in the Eastern Cape has been insisting that disciplinary action be taken against him.

FILE: Former President Jacob Zuma at Ohlange Institute Rally in Inanda during the ANC's January 8th celebrations on 8 January 2018. Picture: Sethembiso Zulu/Eyewitness News.

JOHANNESBURG - The political fallout and deep divisions in the African National Congress (ANC) continue to play out in public following former President Jacob Zuma’s defiance of a Constitutional Court order, compelling him to return to the commission of inquiry into state capture.

While Zuma’s close ally, ANC secretary general Ace Magashule, has called for the former president to be left alone, the party in the Eastern Cape has been insisting that disciplinary action be taken against him.

READ MORE: ‘Leave him alone’ – Magashule says Zuma’s rights must be respected

The Economic Freedom Fighters’ Julius Malema has also entered the fray, roping in Ekurhuleni Mayor and ANC chairperson Mzwandile Masina to have tea with the former president to discuss his stance.

Zuma has always claimed the courts are political and that forcing him to answer questions at the Zondo commission is infringing on his rights.

ALSO READ: Malema may be seeking alliance against Zondo Inquiry with Zuma meeting - analyst

In a world battling with COVID-19, the battlegrounds have shifted from memorial lectures and rallies.

Instead, ANC leaders from opposing sides are mostly taking to social media to share their thoughts on developments around former Zuma.

Those affiliated with Zuma’s radical economic transformation forces are even leaning on apartheid president P.W Botha’s actions during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission era to prove their point.

They say if Botha got away with refusing to participate in a commission, Zuma should be afforded the same luxury.

At the same time, those shocked by the decision have been using the former president’s own words to counter this narrative.

Some insiders have told Eyewitness News they are battling to discuss the matter in public like others have as they feel Zuma’s actions are wrong.

Others, however, argue the country is attempting to understand a political fallout through legal means.

WATCH: 'Zuma has no right to remain silent' - Former president ordered to appear at state capture inquiry

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