Unicef's Daniel Timme describes Cyclone Eloise devastation in Moz

Beira in Mozambique is still recovering from two devastating cyclones, Idai and Kenneth, which hit in 2019, killing hundreds and forcing thousands from their homes.

This video grab made from hand out aerial video footage taken by UNICEF on January 24, 2021 shows widespread flooding in the Buzi area of Mozambique after the landfall of Cyclone Eloise. Tropical Cyclone Eloise made landfall on January 23, with wind speeds of 160 kilometres per hour. Picture: AFP /UNICEF/Bruno Pedro.

JOHANNESBURG - Parts of central Mozambique were flooded after Cyclone Eloise struck near the city of Beira with wind speeds of up to 160km/h.

Unicef’s Daniel Timme was in Beira when the cyclone hit and has on Monday described the devastation to CapeTalk’s Refilwe Moloto: “I was able to experience the desperate situation of the population here, especially in the poorer quarters of the city. There’s been a lot of destruction and many houses have been destroyed.”

Timme said many of the make-shift houses in poorer areas were badly affected.

“We are still not out of the woods as over the next two days we are expecting more flooding as the rains are still continuing, the soil is saturated and rivers were already on alert level. Flooding is the main concern.”

Beira received 250mm of rain in 24 hours, according to Mozambique's National Institute of Meteorology.

The region is still recovering from two devastating cyclones, Idai and Kenneth, which hit in 2019, killing hundreds and forcing thousands from their homes.

Listen to the audio below for more:

Meanwhile, back in South Africa, parts of Limpopo were affected with several roads and bridges flooded, while trees were uprooted.

The cyclone has been downgraded to an overland depression as Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal and Limpopo are bracing for more strong winds and flash floods.

Parts of the Kruger National Park were flooded. Pictures: Storm SA.

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