Lockdown regulations: S.Africans not willing to give up right to privacy – study

The HSRC Narnia Bohler-Muller said round two of the survey showed 70% of the respondents agreed to sacrifice some human rights if it helped slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Gauteng provincial commissioner and Gauteng MEC for community safety Faith Mazibuko together with SAPS Provincial Commissioner, Elias Mawela lead operation  “Okae molao” to ensure that the public is complying to the COVID-19 lockdown regulations in Orange Farm and Everton, South of Johannesburg on 30 April 2020. During the operation expired goods and some items are and resold to the public. Pictures Sethembiso Zulu/EWN.

CAPE TOWN – As lockdown regulations were relaxed and the health minister warned of the possibility of a possible second surge in COVID-19 infections, a new study revealed just how compliant South Africans were with regulations.'

The study was conducted by the University of Johannesburg (UJ) and the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC).

The first round canvassed 12,000 respondents, while the second round was completed in July with over 2,500 South African adults participating.

The HSRC Narnia Bohler-Muller said round two of the survey showed 70% of the respondents agreed to sacrifice some human rights if it helped slow the spread of the coronavirus.

"The rights that people were most willing to sacrifice was to attend their place of worship and the right to travel from place to place."

On the other hand, the right people wanted to sacrifice the least was privacy.

Bohler -Muller said one of the anomalies in the study was that four in 10 adults felt "the threat of Coronavirus is exaggerated".

"People are quite afraid more than 75% feel the worst is yet to come but at the same time there was an expression around the threat may be exaggerated - so we need to unpack these things."

Despite this, over 70% of respondents indicated that they 'always' wore a face mask while a tenth (10%) wore a mask less regularly or never.