It’s anti-white: BLM campaign shows sharp differences in Parly

The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) asked for the debate after the death in the United States of George Floyd triggered global protests.

The National Assembly of South Africa on 22 May 2019. Picture: @GovernmentZA/Twitter.

CAPE TOWN - Calls for South Africa to take up the Black Lives Matter (BLM) campaign sparked a fiery debate in the National Assembly on Tuesday and showed sharp differences among political parties.

The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) asked for the debate after the death in the United States of George Floyd in May triggered global protests.

While all speakers condemned racism, some – like the Democratic Alliance (DA), the Freedom Front Plus (FF+) and the African Christian Democratic Party (ACDP) – were opposed to embracing the BLM campaign.

EFF second-in-command Floyd Shivambu kicked off the debate, describing racism as a disease that must be erased from society, and accusing the African National Congress (ANC) of disregarding black lives.

Shivambu said those who spoke out against racism and white privilege were not racist: “There is no black person who can be racist because they never ever think that they are superior to any other race.”

The ANC’s Richard Dyantyi noted that in America black people were a minority, while in South Africa they were the majority, although impacted by the legacy of colonialism and apartheid.

“The sponsor of the debate was looking for something catchy, but there is no fit.”

The DA’s Ghaleb Cachalia told the House he would not bend his knee “in the service of an agenda that serves certain puppet masters”.

“We must guard against those who use ostensibly noble causes for their own material gain at the expense of the very people they seek to champion and who are perversely incentivised to do so.”

FF+ leader Pieter Groenewald labelled the BLM movement as neo-Marxist and anti-white and aimed at “destroying Western values”.

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