Face of poverty in SA continues to be a rural African woman - Dlamini-Zuma

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma said that research showed that African women had been hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown.

Cooperative Governance Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma at a media briefing in Pretoria on 17 August 2020. Picture: @GCISMedia/Twitter

CAPE TOWN - Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma said that research showed that African women had been hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown.

The minister launched a report titled The Socio-Economic Impact Assessment of COVID-19 in South Africa.

It was compiled by the United Nations Development Programme and looked into the macro and micro implications of the pandemic on society, the economy and particularly vulnerable groups.

The assessment has found that households headed by casually employed, black African women, who had not completed secondary education, had a 73.5% chance of falling into poverty due to the coronavirus lockdown.

In this scenario, the woman lives in Gauteng, is the only working adult in the household and cares for two children.
Dlamini-Zuma said that the report and other data showed that African women continued to have limited access to basic services.

“The face of poverty in our country and inequality continues to be that of a rural or township African woman, sometimes with a baby on the back.”

For this reason, she said that government would be embarking on zero-based and gender-responsive budgeting.

“If we don't really pay attention to gender-responsive budgeting, we will not be able to pay attention and focus on women who bear the face of poverty.”

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