Mandla Mandela pays tribute to his 'feisty, fearless' aunt, Zindzi Mandela

In a post on his Instagram, Mandla Mandela said death had snatched another member of their family too soon and left a gaping chasm of pain.

FILE: Zindzi Mandela at the premiere of 'Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom' in Hollywood in 2013. Picture: AFP

JOHANNESBURG - Mandla Mandela, the nephew of Zindzi Mandela, has paid an emotional tribute to his aunt on social media.

Zindzi Mandela died in the early hours of Monday morning aged 59. She was the second daughter of Nelson Mandela and Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. Mandla is the first child of the late Makgatho Mandela, a son Madiba had with his first wife Evelyn.

In a post on his Instagram, Mandla said that death had snatched another member of their family too soon and left a gaping chasm of pain.

"We shall always treasure fond memories of her as a feisty, fearless and proud freedom fighter in her own right.

"She cut a colossal figure for someone still in her teens when she defied the authorities and read her father’s refusal of PW Botha's conditional release. Her voice powerfully and courageously carried and conveyed Nelson Mandela’s resolute challenge to dismantle apartheid; unban the ANC; free all political prisoners and those who had been banished; the return of all exiles and to guarantee free political activity.

"This is how we shall fondly remember her and remind ourselves that the long walk to freedom is far from over."

View this post on Instagram

Farewell Aunt Zindziswa!! Monday, 13th July 2020: Death has snatched another member of our family too soon and left a gaping chasm of pain in the wake of her passing. We shall always treasure fond memories of her as a feisty, fearless and proud freedom fighter in her own right. Zindziswa the youngest daughter of my grandfather, Nkosi Dalibhunga (Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela) from Mam Winnie, was very close to my father Makgatho Lewanika Mandela in the wake of uTatomkhulu's incarceration. My father acted as a father figure to her in this difficult time. My earliest and fondest childhood recollection of her was my mispronounciation of her name and i called her Zinjisha much to everyone's amusement. I have fond memories of the ride to Brandfort in her purple beetle to visit Mam Winnie. She and my dad were also instrumental in arranging my visit to Polsmoor Prison to meet my grandfather for the first time. I am eternally indebted as this marked an important milestone in my life and the genesis of my political education at a tender young age. For a long time she was the only member of the Mandela family residing at 8115 Vilakazi street in Soweto and we shared many fond and treasured memories. Every time I came by, she would teach me how to play a piano in the lounge. For most activists and ordinary South Africans though, it was the image of a beautiful courageous and fearless Zindzi that inspired them on an unforgettable day of the 10th February 1985 at Soweto's Orlando Stadium. The UDF had organized a celebration of Archbishop Desmond Tutu's Nobel Peace Prize Award. She cut a colossal figure for someone still in her teens when she defied the authorities and read her father’s refusal of PW Botha's conditional release. Her voice powerfully and courageously carried and conveyed Nelson Mandela’s resolute challenge to dismantle apartheid; unban the ANC; free all political prisoners and those who had been banished; the return of all exiles and to guarantee free political activity. This is how we shall fondly remember her and remind ourselves that the long walk to freedom is far from over.

A post shared by Nkosi Zwelivelile 🕋 (@nkosizwelivelile) on

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