20°C / 22°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 11°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 23°C
  • 11°C
  • Wed
  • 23°C
  • 12°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 19°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 20°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 23°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 25°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 26°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 23°C
  • 8°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 8°C
  • Tue
  • 23°C
  • 8°C
  • Wed
  • 24°C
  • 8°C
  • Sun
  • 25°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 27°C
  • 19°C
  • Tue
  • 26°C
  • 19°C
  • Wed
  • 24°C
  • 18°C
  • Sun
  • 24°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 21°C
  • 15°C
  • Wed
  • 20°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 25°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 24°C
  • 10°C
  • Tue
  • 21°C
  • 11°C
  • Wed
  • 23°C
  • 12°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 21°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 21°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 24°C
  • 10°C
  • Mon
  • 26°C
  • 11°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 12°C
  • Wed
  • 26°C
  • 11°C
  • Sun
  • 23°C
  • 6°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 6°C
  • Tue
  • 23°C
  • 6°C
  • Wed
  • 23°C
  • 7°C
  • Sun
  • 28°C
  • 10°C
  • Mon
  • 29°C
  • 11°C
  • Tue
  • 28°C
  • 11°C
  • Wed
  • 29°C
  • 10°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 18°C
  • 13°C

Ballito small business owners help the poor with food planting project

Nevin Davidson, one of the project directors, said in the wake of the 21 days national lockdown, local business owners had decided to use their free time to assist their neighbours.

Picture: pixabay.com

DURBAN - Small business owners in Ballito, north of Durban, are using land at a local sugar rush family park to start a food planting project for neighbouring poor communities.

Nevin Davidson, one of the project directors, said in the wake of the 21 days national lockdown, local business owners had decided to use their free time to assist their neighbours.

Davidson said their planned community garden had already received sponsorship worth over R100,000 and they were hoping to raise more to assist people.

He said the outbreak of the coronavirus had devastated the local community, but it had also highlighted the need for those with more to give back to those with less.

Davidson said they hoped to sustain their community garden beyond the COVID-19 outbreak.

“We know that this virus might be going away in the future, but the economic impact that it will have on all small businesses in the area - if you think about restaurants and people who can’t work – there’s a need for food and support for people in the area. It’s our dream that this will continue for one or two more years,” Davidson said.

The head of farming for the project Scott Meyer said they were growing healthy food for 1,000 impoverished families.

“We have a whole range of different vegetables available,” Meyer said.

Scott said their first crops should be ready within a month.

For official information about COVID-19 from the Department of Health, please click here.

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus