AmaBhungane argues for MPs to disclose political sponsorships

The centre joined the public protector at the High Court in Pretoria in opposing President Cyril Ramaphosa’s bid to prevent the release of his CR17 fundraising records.

President Cyril Ramaphosa. Picture: @PresidencyZA/Twitter

PRETORIA - The AmaBhungane Centre for Investigative Journalism on Wednesday argued that the parliamentary code of ethics should make it compulsory for Members of Parliament (MPs) to disclose political sponsorship.

The centre joined the Public Protector at the High Court in Pretoria in opposing President Cyril Ramaphosa’s bid to prevent the release of his CR17 fundraising records.

AmaBhungane said in its current form, the ethics code fell short of democratic principles.

The centre’s lawyer advocate Steven Budlender said the Executive Ethics Code was ineffective because it didn’t require disclosure of funding for internal party campaigns.

Budlender said the code was inconsistent with the Constitution and the court should declare it invalid.

The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) also agreed that the president was obliged to disclose who funded his 2017 African National Congress campaign. The party said failure to disclose would be a direct violation of the ethical standards expected of the executive.