20°C / 22°C
  • Sun
  • 30°C
  • 17°C
  • Mon
  • 31°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 27°C
  • 15°C
  • Wed
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 21°C
  • 16°C
  • Tue
  • 24°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 25°C
  • 19°C
  • Thu
  • 25°C
  • 19°C
  • Fri
  • 25°C
  • 19°C
  • Sun
  • 32°C
  • 19°C
  • Mon
  • 33°C
  • 19°C
  • Tue
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 19°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 19°C
  • Fri
  • 32°C
  • 19°C
  • Sun
  • 30°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 32°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 29°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 29°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 29°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 28°C
  • 20°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 20°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 20°C
  • Wed
  • 26°C
  • 22°C
  • Thu
  • 26°C
  • 22°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 22°C
  • Sun
  • 20°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 20°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 28°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 31°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 34°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 34°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 34°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 10°C
  • Mon
  • 26°C
  • 9°C
  • Tue
  • 28°C
  • 12°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 32°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 32°C
  • 18°C
  • Mon
  • 34°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 29°C
  • 18°C
  • Wed
  • 33°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 33°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 33°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 32°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 30°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 33°C
  • 15°C
  • Wed
  • 35°C
  • 18°C
  • Thu
  • 35°C
  • 18°C
  • Fri
  • 35°C
  • 18°C
  • Sun
  • 35°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 25°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 28°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 20°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 22°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 22°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 17°C

Strong labour market institutions ‘important’ to achieve decent work for all

Delegates at the gathering are discussing how social dialogue and gender equality can lead to the realisation of the ILO’s decent work agenda and the United Nations' sustainable development goals.

Presidential Panel on the 'Future of Work We Want for Africa' in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, on 5 December 2019. Picture: Flickr.

ABIDJAN - Experts addressing the International Labour Organisation's (ILO) regional meeting in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, say strong labour market institutions are essential for the implementation of set international standards.

Delegates at the gathering are discussing how social dialogue and gender equality can lead to the realisation of the ILO’s decent work agenda and the United Nations' sustainable development goals.

The organisation’s decent work agenda integrates several programmes in pursuit of full, productive employment and decent work for all.

The gathering has been reflecting on the strides made by ILO member states in achieving this, with delegates saying there was still a long way to go for many states across the continent as work had in some cases become more precarious.

University of Cape Town professor Evance Kalula said social dialogue platforms such as South Africa’s Nedlac could ensure the implementation of policies which would increase labour market participation and inclusion.

“Governance is key; it needs to be transparent, have a sense of ownership of not only the players but of the beneficiaries as well outside the labour market. So, labour markets are important in that sense.”

Business Unity South Africa’s Kaizer Moyane - who was on the panel interrogating the issue - agreed with Kalula.

Moyane said social partners, which comprise government, labour, employers and community, were able to hold each other accountable on commitments and conventions agreed to on the international stage - as opposed to when there were no strong labour market institutions.

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus