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Men living in urban areas more likely to be robbed - Stats SA

According to Stats SA’s Victims of Crime Survey, 580,000 incidents were recorded where knives and guns were the primary weapons used to threaten victims.

Statistician general Risenga Maluleke. Picture: GCIS.

JOHANNESBURG - Statistics South Africa on Thursday said street robberies were on the rise in the past year, with victims most likely men and people based in the Western Cape.

Stats SA recorded 580,000 incidents where knives and guns were the primary weapons used to threaten victims.

The Victims of Crime Survey also said 1.1 million people were affected by street robberies, marking a 2.8% increase compared to the previous year. The crimes appeared to peak in February, June, September, and December.

“There were about 580,000 incidences of street robbery in 2018/19, affecting round about 1% of the people aged 16 or older. Males were more than twice as likely as females to be victims of street robbery. Similarly, people living in metropolitan areas were more likely to be victims of street robbery than those living in non-metros.

“Western Cape had the highest (1,9%) percentage of people aged 16 and above who were victims of street robbery compared to other provinces. The weapons most commonly used for street robbery were knives (62%) and guns (37%),” the report stated.

The statistics agency also said while more South Africans were resorting to various physical protection measures against crime, about 27% of them gave up trying.

The survey showed how adults aged 16 and older, took on measures such as installing bugler doors with 21% of them only walking during safe hours.

The report, released on Thursday, indicated housebreakings were the number one category crime with over one million households falling victim to them.

Statistician general Risenga Maluleke said: “It happened to be number one followed by home robberies, where they can come in and steal property even when there are people. Housebreaking is when they couldn’t find someone home.”

WATCH: Housebreaking the most common crime in SA

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