20°C / 22°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 25°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 26°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 29°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 26°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 28°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 13°C
  • Sat
  • 20°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 15°C
  • Wed
  • 25°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Tue
  • 28°C
  • 17°C
  • Wed
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 31°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 32°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 23°C
  • 19°C
  • Sat
  • 27°C
  • 20°C
  • Sun
  • 25°C
  • 20°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 29°C
  • 19°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 20°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 22°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 21°C
  • 15°C
  • Wed
  • 21°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 10°C
  • Sat
  • 23°C
  • 12°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 11°C
  • Mon
  • 27°C
  • 10°C
  • Tue
  • 31°C
  • 11°C
  • Wed
  • 34°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 20°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 23°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 27°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 31°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 33°C
  • 16°C
  • Tue
  • 29°C
  • 18°C
  • Wed
  • 30°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 33°C
  • 13°C
  • Sat
  • 33°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 33°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 33°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 34°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 35°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 30°C
  • 17°C
  • Sun
  • 27°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 28°C
  • 16°C
  • Wed
  • 31°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 10°C
  • Sat
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 10°C
  • Tue
  • 25°C
  • 12°C
  • Wed
  • 22°C
  • 13°C

Corruption Watch feels ‘vindicated’ by CPS, Sassa court judgment

The court has ordered CPS to pay R316 million back to Sassa.

FILE: South African Social Security Agency in Pretoria. Picture: Kayleen Morgan/EWN

JOHANNESBURG - Corruption Watch on Monday said it felt vindicated by Monday's Supreme Court of Appeal judgment in a matter involving Cash Paymaster Services (CPS) and the South African Social Security Agency (Sassa).

The court has ordered CPS to pay R316 million back to Sassa.

The money was irregularly paid to the company in 2014.

CPS has also been instructed to pay Corruption Watch's legal costs.

The Supreme Court of Appeal ruled that there was no justifiable reason for CPS to invoice Sassa for the registration of minors as beneficiaries for child support grants.

Corruption Watch lawyer Caroline James explained to Eyewitness News: “Even if that is done lawfully and correctly following the procurement procedures and supply chain management, there is always a potential for corruption when that contract is extended or varied.”

James said they were pleased the Supreme Court of Appeal upheld the judgment by the High Court in Pretoria.

“We’re very excited and feel vindicated in the long work this case has taken.”

Sassa has welcomed the ruling, saying it would study it further.

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus