20°C / 22°C
  • Mon
  • 29°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 30°C
  • 11°C
  • Wed
  • 30°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 29°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 12°C
  • Sat
  • 28°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 21°C
  • 12°C
  • Wed
  • 24°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 28°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 18°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 31°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 32°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 31°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 30°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 30°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 30°C
  • 8°C
  • Tue
  • 31°C
  • 11°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 30°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 31°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 25°C
  • 16°C
  • Tue
  • 24°C
  • 18°C
  • Wed
  • 24°C
  • 18°C
  • Thu
  • 24°C
  • 20°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 19°C
  • Sat
  • 25°C
  • 19°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 20°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 21°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 17°C
  • Sat
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 22°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 24°C
  • 12°C
  • Wed
  • 27°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 13°C
  • Sat
  • 16°C
  • 9°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 20°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 22°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 15°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 31°C
  • 14°C
  • Tue
  • 33°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 33°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 33°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 31°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 31°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 30°C
  • 10°C
  • Tue
  • 32°C
  • 12°C
  • Wed
  • 33°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 31°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 31°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 27°C
  • 15°C
  • Tue
  • 30°C
  • 12°C
  • Wed
  • 33°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 27°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 13°C
  • Sat
  • 31°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Wed
  • 22°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 28°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 20°C
  • 11°C

Gender parity fundamental to driving African growth

Ensuring the full development and productive deployment of half the world’s population will radically transform African economies.

Picture: Primedia

The world will only reach gender parity in the year 2236 at the current rate of progress, according to United Nations Women.

Ensuring the full development and productive deployment of half the world’s population will radically transform African economies.

Female labour force participation on the continent varies widely, from a high of 84% in Rwanda to a low of 19% in Somalia.

South Africa has a female labour force participation rate of 49%.

Sola David-Borha, chief executive, Africa regions, Standard Bank Group, and UN Women’s Anne Githuku-Shongwe shared details of their partnership to help achieve gender parity on the sidelines of the 2019 World Economic Forum in Cape Town.

“If we do nothing different, gender inequality will persist for the next 217 years,” said Githuku-Shongwe.

She detailed the UN’s “HeForShe” solidarity campaign for the advancement of gender equality.

The campaign is grounded in the idea that gender inequality negative affects all people.

It encourages both genders to be agents of change.

She also spoke about the UN’s “Unstereotype Alliance”.

When you sell a Jaguar, why do we need a half-naked woman as a sales pitch?

UN Women’s Anne Githuku-Shongwe.

David-Borha argued that achieving gender equality should be fundamental to the way you run a business.

Standard Bank wants 40% of its executives to be a woman by 2023.

“It’s an ambitious target; the bank is only halfway there,” said David-Borha.

The bank is aiming to transform the gender makeup of CEOs in the 19 countries outside of South Africa where it operates.

Only about 10% of chief executives are women. We’re going to double that by 2021

Sola David-Borha, chief executive, Africa regions, Standard Bank Group.

Standard Bank exists to drive Africa’s growth, she said. "You can’t ignore women."

“It’s a business imperative! In sub-Saharan Africa, more than half of agricultural production is done by women. In the SADC region about 70% of informal traders are women. Women are actively involved in economic activity. What they don’t have is access to finance.”

Empowering women drives economic growth. “At Standard Bank, this is our purpose.”

Click here to read more from the Gender Equality archive.

Click here to read more from the Inclusive Growth archive.

Click here to return to the 54 and 1 portal - brought to you by Standard Bank.

Listen to the full conversation between EWN's WEF correspondent Arabile Gumede and Standard Bank Group's Sola David-Borha and UN Women’s Anne Githuku-Shongwe.

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus