20°C / 22°C
  • Sun
  • 29°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 28°C
  • 16°C
  • Tue
  • 29°C
  • 14°C
  • Wed
  • 30°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 24°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 29°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 20°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Thu
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 23°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 32°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 31°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 29°C
  • 15°C
  • Wed
  • 30°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 25°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 32°C
  • 18°C
  • Mon
  • 30°C
  • 15°C
  • Tue
  • 30°C
  • 18°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 27°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 30°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 23°C
  • 17°C
  • Mon
  • 21°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 23°C
  • 18°C
  • Wed
  • 22°C
  • 18°C
  • Thu
  • 25°C
  • 18°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 18°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 14°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 20°C
  • 11°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 21°C
  • 9°C
  • Mon
  • 21°C
  • 7°C
  • Tue
  • 21°C
  • 8°C
  • Wed
  • 27°C
  • 8°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 9°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 9°C
  • Sun
  • 16°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Tue
  • 17°C
  • 12°C
  • Wed
  • 21°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 19°C
  • 12°C
  • Fri
  • 21°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 32°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 31°C
  • 18°C
  • Tue
  • 29°C
  • 17°C
  • Wed
  • 32°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 27°C
  • 17°C
  • Fri
  • 32°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 30°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 31°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 33°C
  • 13°C
  • Wed
  • 34°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 32°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 32°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 22°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 31°C
  • 15°C
  • Wed
  • 26°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 26°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 16°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 17°C
  • 10°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 10°C
  • Wed
  • 19°C
  • 11°C
  • Thu
  • 20°C
  • 10°C
  • Fri
  • 20°C
  • 12°C

US to keep up pressure on Sudan as it discusses lifting sanctions

Sudan was designated a state sponsor of terrorism in 1993 under former US President Bill Clinton, cutting it off from financial markets and strangling its economy.

Abdallah Hamdok, speaks after being sworn in as Sudan's interim prime minister in the capital Khartoum on 21 August 2019. Picture: AFP

WASHINGTON - The United States will test the commitment of Sudan’s new transitional government to human rights, freedom of speech and humanitarian access before it agrees to remove the country from a state sponsor of terrorism list, a senior US official said on Monday.

The State Department official, speaking to reporters on background, said while Sudan’s new Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok would be the main point of contact, US diplomats would also have to interact with General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, commonly known as Hemedti, the outgoing deputy chief of the military council who heads a widely feared paramilitary group.

“Prime Minister Hamdok has said all the right things so we look forward to engaging with him,” the State Department official said. “This new government has shown a commitment so far. We are going to keep testing that commitment,” the official added.

Hamdok, an economist, was sworn in last week as leader of a transition government, vowing to stabilise the country and solve its economic crisis.

The official said the new government had emphasised in recent talks with US officials that it wanted the country removed from the terrorism sponsor list, which limits Sudan’s access to international financing, including from lenders such as International Monetary Fund and World Bank.

Hamdok, who has worked for the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, told Reuters on Sunday he was seeking up to $10 billion in foreign funding over the next two years to cover Sudan’s import bill and help it rebuild.

“It is an obstacle right now,” the official acknowledged referring to US sanctions, adding: “It will take a little bit of time to work through but we are committed to doing that. We want to have a positive dialogue with this new civilian government.”

Sudan was designated a state sponsor of terrorism in 1993 under former US President Bill Clinton, cutting it off from financial markets and strangling its economy.

Washington lifted a 20-year trade embargo against Sudan in 2017 and was in the process of discussions on removing it from the US list when the military stepped in on 11 April to depose veteran autocrat Omar al-Bashir, who ruled Sudan for 30 years.

Mounting public anger over shortages of food, fuel and hard currency triggered mass demonstrations that eventually forced Bashir from power in April.

The Trump administration suspended talks on normalising relations with Sudan and demanded that the military hand power to a civilian government.

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus