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Drones offer bird's-eye view on Ivorian agriculture

Farmers in Côte d'Ivoire are increasingly keeping an eye on their remote lands through the use of drones.

Drones are assisting farmers in Côte d'Ivoire to map and monitor their land from afar. Picture: WeFly Agri

When WeFly Agri launched in Côte d'Ivoire in 2017, the start-up sought to address the lack of visibility that plantation landlords had over their agricultural investments by bridging the information gap with precision agriculture.

This meant that landlords were no longer held back by the traditional method of running operations which required them to place their faith in the accuracy of their plantation supervisor reports. Now, they are able to map and monitor their own land from afar.

Travelling in Côte d'Ivoire for Standard Bank’s Africa Connected, Lee Kasumba stopped by the headquarters of WeFly Agri to talk drone technology and agricultural potential.

We want to give back power to plantation owners and even farmers.

Ackson Mwenda, aerospace engineer at WeFly Agri

With the use of drones, landlords are able to see the state of their crops, whether their plants are water-stressed and are able to determine whether they are over-spending on their irrigation systems – contributing to a large-scale profitability.

It’s having all the data you need to make well-informed decisions.

Ackson Mwenda, aerospace engineer at WeFly Agri

Since its inception, the company has made a positive impact on the agriculture industry and has quickly gained favour with plantation landlords and farmers, who are excited to produce in a cost-effective and efficient way.

We can do more with this African land, because we have the potential.

Ackson Mwenda, aerospace engineer at WeFly Agri

Click here to read more from the Digitisation for Good archive.

Click here to return to the 54 and 1 portal - brought to you by Standard Bank.

Click here to access the Africa Connected portal or click below to watch Lee Kasumba's full interview with Ackson Mwenda.

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