20°C / 22°C
  • Thu
  • 26°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 27°C
  • 10°C
  • Sat
  • 30°C
  • 10°C
  • Sun
  • 29°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Tue
  • 27°C
  • 15°C
  • Thu
  • 21°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 16°C
  • Sat
  • 19°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Tue
  • 20°C
  • 12°C
  • Thu
  • 28°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 29°C
  • 13°C
  • Sat
  • 30°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 32°C
  • 15°C
  • Mon
  • 28°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Thu
  • 29°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 10°C
  • Sat
  • 30°C
  • 12°C
  • Sun
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 30°C
  • 18°C
  • Tue
  • 31°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 18°C
  • Fri
  • 21°C
  • 18°C
  • Sat
  • 24°C
  • 18°C
  • Sun
  • 23°C
  • 17°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 18°C
  • Tue
  • 24°C
  • 18°C
  • Thu
  • 22°C
  • 15°C
  • Fri
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 20°C
  • 15°C
  • Sun
  • 18°C
  • 13°C
  • Mon
  • 18°C
  • 12°C
  • Tue
  • 19°C
  • 13°C
  • Thu
  • 23°C
  • 11°C
  • Fri
  • 28°C
  • 13°C
  • Sat
  • 24°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 22°C
  • 11°C
  • Mon
  • 22°C
  • 8°C
  • Tue
  • 22°C
  • 7°C
  • Thu
  • 19°C
  • 14°C
  • Fri
  • 22°C
  • 15°C
  • Sat
  • 18°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Tue
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Thu
  • 30°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 30°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 31°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 33°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 32°C
  • 18°C
  • Tue
  • 32°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 27°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 29°C
  • 11°C
  • Sat
  • 31°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 33°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 32°C
  • 15°C
  • Tue
  • 30°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 27°C
  • 16°C
  • Fri
  • 26°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 29°C
  • 13°C
  • Sun
  • 29°C
  • 16°C
  • Mon
  • 23°C
  • 17°C
  • Tue
  • 32°C
  • 17°C
  • Thu
  • 20°C
  • 13°C
  • Fri
  • 21°C
  • 14°C
  • Sat
  • 18°C
  • 14°C
  • Sun
  • 17°C
  • 12°C
  • Mon
  • 17°C
  • 11°C
  • Tue
  • 18°C
  • 10°C

Medical researchers a step closer to unlocking population genetic makeup

In a first for the continent, the South African Medical Research Council launched its state-of-the-art Genomics Centre situated at the facility’s Bellville campus on Monday.

The South African Medical Research Council has launched its state-of-the-art whole human genome sequencing centre in Cape Town on 29 July 2019. Picture: Kevin Brandt/EWN.

CAPE TOWN - Medical researchers were now one step closer to unlocking the “hidden secrets” of our population’s genetic makeup.

In a first for the continent, the South African Medical Research Council launched its state-of-the-art Genomics Centre situated at the facility’s Bellville campus on Monday.

Individual genome sequencing enables scientists to better understand how a particular patients’ genes relate to illness.

Experts said patients would benefit from the initiative, as more effective medication geared towards the population’s gene pool could now be developed.

South African Medical Research Council president and CEO Professor Glenda Gray said the unit had already done genetic sequencing of amongst others those in HIV-remission.

“So, this child could unlock a whole avenue of understanding why HIV co-exist peacefully with this child and why this child has not become susceptible to HIV progression.”

Medical Research Council Board Chairperson Professor Mike Sathekge said genome sequencing would also help to address the country’s burden of disease.

“This is an important event for the continent and for the country in a sense that for the first time, we really have whole genomic sequencing happening here, this facility will make sure that we as Africans can stop being consumers of research, but we can be leaders as well.”

Scientists said the facility also provided opportunities for employment.

Comments

EWN welcomes all comments that are constructive, contribute to discussions in a meaningful manner and take stories forward.

However, we will NOT condone the following:

- Racism (including offensive comments based on ethnicity and nationality)
- Sexism
- Homophobia
- Religious intolerance
- Cyber bullying
- Hate speech
- Derogatory language
- Comments inciting violence.

We ask that your comments remain relevant to the articles they appear on and do not include general banter or conversation as this dilutes the effectiveness of the comments section.

We strive to make the EWN community a safe and welcoming space for all.

EWN reserves the right to: 1) remove any comments that do not follow the above guidelines; and, 2) ban users who repeatedly infringe the rules.

Should you find any comments upsetting or offensive you can also flag them and we will assess it against our guidelines.

EWN is constantly reviewing its comments policy in order to create an environment conducive to constructive conversations.

comments powered by Disqus