Lesotho's Sam Matekane calls on private sector to stand up to political leaders

Sam Matekane and other businessmen at the event expressed frustration as the prime minister’s party, the All Basotho Convention, continues with factional battles that are marginalising service delivery and making investors anxious.

FILE: Lesotho businessman Sam Matekane. Picture: Matekane Group/Facebook.

JOHANNESBURG - Renowned Lesotho businessman Sam Matekane has called on the private sector in that country to stand up to political leaders who are causing instability and unemployment.

He spoke out after receiving an accolade for veteran businessman at the inaugural Lesotho Men of Honour awards.
The Lesotho Men of Honour Awards were held to recognize contributions by men in fields including education, law, culture, politics and business.

Celebrated musician Tsepoo Tshola received the Lifetime Achievement Award while billionaire Sam Matekane scooped the Veteran Businessman Award.

Matekane came from humble beginnings as a truck owner-driver, but grew his business to civils and property construction, and mining. In the region, he has expanded his business to South Africa, Botswana, Mozambique and Namibia, and some of his partnerships are listed on the London Stock Exchange.

He is the first Mosotho to own an aviation company that runs a fleet of charter passenger planes and helicopters.

Matekane and other businessmen at the event expressed frustration as the prime minister’s party, the All Basotho Convention, continues with factional battles that are marginalising service delivery and making investors anxious.

Lesotho's vulnerability committee said a quarter of the population is facing food insecurity and the constant political upheavals are worsening the situation, but entrepreneurs including Matekane are now speaking out.

He said business must stand up, confront the leaders and tell them that they are failing the people because there are no jobs – only conflicts.

Meanwhile, uncertainty continues in the prime minster’s party that leads a coalition government of four parties and while Parliament is closed, a motion of no confidence in the prime minister looms large.