IEC awaits full report on sample of indelible ink in double voting matter

The supposedly indelible ink was one of the security measures used to protect the voting system.

A Langa resident gets her thumb marked before casting her vote on 8 May 2019. Picture: Bertram Malgas/EWN

JOHANNESBURG – The Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) said it was waiting for a full report on a sample of the indelible ink that was used during the elections and sparked fears of fraud through double voting because it was easily removable from some voters' thumbs.

The commission on Tuesday announced a preliminary report showed that a sample sent to the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research indicated that some of the markers may have had bigger particles that failed to stick to the skin of certain voters.

The supposedly indelible ink was one of the security measures used to protect the voting system.

The IEC's Masego Shiburi says: “We just need to await the full report so that we can quantify the full extent of this and also understand why some tents had an issue and the majority functioned very well in terms of the specification.”